Norment: away from the theatre, she specialised in political roles

Elizabeth Norment: Shakespearian actress who became best known for playing opposite Kevin Spacey in 'House of Cards'

Although she was a noted Shakespearian in the theatre, the actress Elizabeth Norment, who has died of cancer at the age of 61, was probably best known for playing the executive secretary of Frank Underwood, the diabolical figure played by Kevin Spacey in Netflix’s US version of the political drama House of Cards, a dark thriller set in Washington’s halls of power.

Fraser in 2002: he acquired celebrity status among the ‘lads’ mags’ generation

Frankie Fraser: Career criminal who spent 42 years in jail and spent much of that time violently clashing with authority

"Mad" Frank Fraser was a Zelig-like figure in London’s underworld. His career touched every major crime figure of his generation, from the years leading up to the Second World War to the decades after it.

Hughes in Durban in 2009, celebrating the first of his two centuries in the second Test against South Africa

Phillip Hughes: Batsman whose aggressive but effective style made him the perfect cricketer for the modern game

For a cricketer remembered fondly by team-mates for being quiet and self-effacing but with a cheeky sense of humour and a friendly and generous nature, Phillip Hughes, who has died a few days short of his 26th birthday, tended to announce himself spectacularly on the field.

James sits by her typewriter in 1980

PD James: Novelist and public servant who began as a crime writer but whose work crossed over into mainstream fiction

Phyllis Dorothy James was born in 1920, the eldest of three children of an Inland Revenue officer, Sidney Victor James, and his wife, Dorothy

Neal at Stamford Bridge in 1981; but for ill-health he might have been in the front rank of managers

John Neal: Footballer and manager who led impecunious Chelsea out of the Second Division doldrums in the early 1980s

John Neal was a Chelsea manager of the quiet and unassuming variety, but his impact at Stamford Bridge was profound. A resourceful and exceptionally shrewd football man, he did much to transform the playing fortunes of the club during the first half of the 1980s, providing a welcome interlude of stability and improvement in turbulent times for the impecunious Londoners, though somehow missing out on much of the public acclaim he deserved.

Reeve and Nelson Mandela in 1994 at a party in Pretoria to celebrate the Queen’s birthday

Sir Anthony Reeve: Ambassador to South Africa who became close to Nelson Mandela despite Margaret Thatcher's opposition to UN sanctions

Anthony Reeve arrived in South Africa in July 1991, at an unprecedented and particularly uncertain moment in that country's history.

Burgdorfer in 1954 at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana

Doctor Willy Burgdorfer: Researcher acclaimed round the world for his discovery of the micro-organism that transmits Lyme disease

Willy Burgdorfer was a Swiss-born medical entomologist who gained international recognition for discovering the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. He spent decades researching the connections between animal and human diseases caused by the bites of fleas, ticks and mosquitoes.

Sir Thomas Macpherson: Soldier who with his guile, imagination and talent for bluffing played a crucial role for the Allies after D-Day

Through the trees a group of men and boys watched the harbinger of death: SS Panzer division Das Reich, which had stopped for the night as it traversed France. They did not know its name; only that its men were taking vengeance by stringing villagers up on lamp-posts along the way. The motley group was a French resistance cell, and they had a new leader, a vision in the moonlight in full Scottish Highland military rig, his kilt swinging, who now inspired them to quick work to stop the tanks.

Arthur Butterworth: Composer whose work was suffused with his love of the landscapes of northern England and the Scottish highlands

Arthur Butterworth's major works for orchestra span his career − seven symphonies, a violin concerto played by Nigel Kennedy, a viola concerto recorded by Sarah-Jane Bradley, a guitar concerto for Craig Ogden, a notable organ concerto premiered by Gillian Weir in 1973 and others for cello and bassoon. His work was always informed by his deep love of the north of the country.

Viktor Tikhonov: Ice hockey coach who led the Soviets to Olympic gold but lost to the US in 1980 in 'The Miracle on Ice'

Viktor Tikhonov was a Soviet hockey coach whose teams won three Olympic gold medals but fell to the US in "The Miracle on Ice".Under Tikhonov, the Soviet "Big Red Machine" was a powerhouse, although it had to settle for the silver medal at the 1980 Olympics in Lake Placid after the stunning defeat to the US.

Barry, left, in 1978, after winning his first mayoral election

Marion Barry: Civil rights hero who went on to become mayor of Washington but was laid low by his personal demons

Marion Barry could have been a great man, an indomitable fighter for civil rights and the mayor who made Washington DC whole. Instead, he will be remembered above all as a racial polariser brought low by his demons, his career summarised by grainy images of him smoking crack cocaine with a former mistress at a downtown hotel.

Pasco with his wife and son at Buckingham Palace in 1977 after receiving his CBE

Richard Pasco: RSC stalwart lauded for his verse-speaking who gave some of the finest Shakespearian performances of his generation

An actor of great humanity and warmth, and one of the finest verse-speakers of his age, Richard Pasco was an Olympian classical player whose 11-year adventure with the RSC from 1969-1980 produced some of the most significant and incisive Shakespearean performances of the era. Pasco exuded a fatherly warmth but was also equipped with searching, little-boy-lost eyes, giving him both a resolute dignity and a romantic vulnerability.

Kani: he headed various committees, including the Combatant
Clergy Association

Ayatollah Kani: Cleric who was championed by Ayatollah Khomeini and led the body which chooses Iran's Supreme Leader

Ayatollah Mohammadreza Mahdavi Kani was a cleric who headed Iran's most influential clerical body charged with choosing or dismissing the nation's Supreme Leader. Kani was the chairman of the Assembly of Experts, a body of 86 senior clerics that monitors the Supreme Leader and picks a successor after his death. That makes it potentially one of the most powerful institutions in Iran, although it does not involve itself in the daily affairs of state.

Prince David Chavchavadze: Descendant of Czar Nicholas who became a CIA officer recruiting and interrogating Cold War Russian agents

‘I would be the only Romanov working actively against the Bolshevik regime’

Bendukidze: he was in line for a key post in Georgia at the time of his death

Kakha Bendukidze: Businessman and statesman who fell foul of Vladimir Putin but rescued Georgia’s post-Soviet economy

‘Right now the Russian authorities do not need such talented people,’ said Boris Berezovsky

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Austen Lloyd: Private Client Solicitor - Oxford

Excellent Salary : Austen Lloyd: OXFORD - REGIONAL FIRM - An excellent opportu...

Austen Lloyd: Clinical Negligence Associate / Partner - Bristol

Super Package: Austen Lloyd: BRISTOL - SENIOR CLINICAL NEGLIGENCE - An outstan...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Consultant - Solar Energy - OTE £50,000

£15000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Fantastic opportunities are ava...

Recruitment Genius: Compute Engineer

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: A Compute Engineer is required to join a globa...

Day In a Page

Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Austen Lloyd: Private Client Solicitor - Oxford

Excellent Salary : Austen Lloyd: OXFORD - REGIONAL FIRM - An excellent opportu...

Austen Lloyd: Clinical Negligence Associate / Partner - Bristol

Super Package: Austen Lloyd: BRISTOL - SENIOR CLINICAL NEGLIGENCE - An outstan...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Consultant - Solar Energy - OTE £50,000

£15000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Fantastic opportunities are ava...

Recruitment Genius: Compute Engineer

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: A Compute Engineer is required to join a globa...

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us