For the modern era of the famously famous, the Kardashians are the ones to aspire to

Man About Town

A phalanx of security guards linked hands as they walked Kim and Kourtney Kardashian through the party thrown in their honour. Your average Hollywood A-lister might have blushed at having such tight security for a very innocuous crowd. But for the Kardashians it only added to the effect of their curious stardom.

For those who don't know, the sisters are famous for being famous. One, however, (Kim) is marginally more famous than the others for having a famous bottom.

But really that's too dismissive. Kim, Kourtney and Khloé Kardashian (are you noticing a theme?) are the stars of one of America's most popular reality shows. And you can be as snobbish as you like about those sorts of programmes, but since they found fame by having cameras follow them around, they bring in millions each year through TV and endorsement work.

It was through one of these deals that I met them on Thursday night on a red carpet in the Aqua restaurant in Mayfair.

The sisters have designed a range of fashion at Dorothy Perkins and on the night, Sir Philip Green, the billionaire owner of Dorothy Perkins and a man who knows the value of celebrity, was on hand as an extra minder fetching coats for his new partners.

When we met, they gave the sort of answers that demonstrate what media-savvy types they are. Making sure I noted that their new range was at "an affordable price", Kim said: "We wanted women to not feel intimidated."

Without the traditional "talents" of the traditional celebrity, today's reality personalities have found newly marketable talents in how they present themselves to the public.

"I specifically don't use swear words when I'm out in public or on Twitter," Kim told me, when I asked about how she dealt with the responsibility of fame. "I wish sometimes I didn't care as much."

When they finally made it to their VIP area, it wasn't just the usual hacks and hangers on trying to get close to the Ks: it was also some famous faces.

I watched as X-Factor contestants and a character on the "scripted reality" series, Made in Chelsea, tried either to get close to, or failing that, take photos of the sisters.

For the modern era of the famously famous, the Kardashians are the ones to aspire to.

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