Mark Wahlberg: Celebrities should not talk about politics

Actor says celebrities live in a 'bubble' and  so are not aware of the issues people face day to day

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Mark Wahlberg has said celebrities should keep their political opinions to themselves, saying they live in a “bubble” and have no real understanding of the issues faced by others. 

Unlike the majority of Hollywood, the Ted actor kept quiet about his political leanings over the tempestuous election period. When asked why he did not get involved or actively endorse anyone throughout the 18-month campaign, Wahlberg said he didn't feel in a position to do so because of his own privilege. 

“A lot of celebrities, did, do and shouldn’t [give their political opinions],” he told Task and Purpose magazine, which is aimed at US veterans.

“You know, it just goes to show that people aren’t listening to that anyway. They might buy your CD or watch your movie but you don’t put food on their table. You don’t pay their bills. A lot of Hollywood is living in a bubble. They’re pretty out of touch with the common person, the everyday guy out there providing for their family.”

The majority of high-profile people lending their voice to the presidential election supported Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. Aside from a few particularly vocal Donald Trump supporters, including the actors Jon Voight and Scott Baio, any famous people who did support Mr Trump kept it on the downlow.

Wahlberg argued he is more aware of the issues facing Americans because he “exists in the real world”.

“Me, I’m very aware of the real world. I come from the real world and I exist in the real world. And although I can navigate Hollywood and I love the business and the opportunities it’s afforded me, I also understand what it’s like not to have all that,” he said.

Yet after giving his thoughts on why celebrities should not get involved in politics he then addressed Mr Trump’s previous comments pledging to ban Muslims from the US. 

Discussing his new film Patriots Day, which follows the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings committed by the Tsarnaev brothers, Wahlberg called the premise of barring an entire religion “completely absurd and unacceptable”.

“I have a lot of Muslim friends who are really amazing people,” he said. “So anything like that is just completely absurd and unacceptable to me. I’m a devout Catholic. I have a lot of Jewish friends. I’ve got a lot of friends from all over the world. And I think a lot of people have been mistreated for a long time and we need to fix that. 

“There’s a big difference between a Muslim and a terrorist. Big, big difference.”

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