The Camerons fly out by easyJet for a week in Ibiza

The Prime Minister and his wife want to show they are in touch with Britain's 'squeezed middle'

It is the holiday destination synonymous with 24-hour clubbing, recreational drug-taking and some of the worst examples of Brits-abroad loutishness.

But David and Samantha Cameron have chosen Ibiza for a break with their young children.

The Prime Minister and his family are spending the week on the island once described by the Daily Mail as the "Gomorrah of the Med".

Taking advantage of the parliamentary recess, the Camerons flew by easyJet from Stansted for their first family holiday since the birth of Florence last August.

Mrs Cameron travelled with their baby daughter on Friday, while her husband flew out with their elder children – Nancy, 7, and Arthur, 5 – yesterday morning.

It is understood that Mrs Cameron attended the International Music Summit – the annual event for the dance music industry dubbed the "Davos for DJs" – at Dalt Villa overlooking Ibiza Town, partying until midnight on Friday. The Camerons are visiting friends who live in Ibiza. Although Mrs Cameron is a long-time friend of Mick Jagger's daughter Jade, who has a luxury villa on the island, sources declined to confirm that this was where the family were staying.

The Camerons' apparent enthusiasm for low-cost air travel follows their choice of Ryanair to take an Easter mini-break to Malaga, designed to show they are in touch with Britain's "squeezed middle".

Ibiza became a popular holiday choice for partying Britons in the 1990s and was celebrated in the dubious 1999 Europop anthem by The Venga Boys, "We're Going to Ibiza", which included the lyrics: "I look up at the sky/and I see the clouds/I look down at the ground/and I see the rainbow down the drain."

However, Ibiza has a trendier if more low-key side, away from the seaside resorts, and the Camerons are staying in a secluded hillside spot.

The Camerons will have spent a little over £700 on return flights for themselves and their children. The break has left the Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg, in charge.

In perhaps a similar echo of Mr Cameron's own career, Ibiza's government launched a major rebranding exercise in the middle of the past decade. It introduced planning rules blocking the building of new cheap hotels and banned nightclubs from opening beyond 6am.

While holidaymakers can still enjoy dance music through most of the night, Ibiza's music scene has shifted in the past 10 years towards live music, with Ibiza Rocks becoming as much an attraction as Space or Café del Mar.

Also flying abroad on holiday yesterday were Ed Miliband and Justine Thornton, who married on Friday. By coincidence, the Labour leader and his wife also chose easyJet to get to their honeymoon destination. A spokeswoman for Mr Miliband refused to disclose where they were holidaying, saying only that it was outside Britain, in Europe, and somewhere "sunny". They flew from Gatwick yesterday afternoon. The spokeswoman said the newly-weds had not travelled to Ibiza – quashing hopes that the Camerons and the Miliband-Thorntons could go clubbing together on the island.

After a civil ceremony at Langar Hall near Nottingham, Mr Miliband and Ms Thornton, an environmental lawyer, held a party for 50 friends at their north London home on Friday night. Mr Miliband's brother and defeated leadership rival David, who had been at the wedding, decided not to attend the party – travelling instead to the Hay Festival where he had a speaking engagement.

The guests – who did not include a single MP – drank champagne and ate canapés from Flavours, a Kentish Town delicatessen.

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