Tottenham winger Andros Townsend facing a lengthy spell on the sidelines after injuring his hamstring in League Cup defeat to West Ham

Townsend limped off in the second half and could miss crucial matches for Spurs as they attempt to get their season back on track
  • @JackdeMenezes

Tottenham’s woes look set to continue after they lost winger Andros Townsend to a hamstring injury in the 2-1 defeat to West Ham on Wednesday that could keep him out of their busy Christmas schedule.

Spurs saw their League Cup hopes go up in smoke after conceding two goals in the final 10 minutes to overturn a 1-0 deficit and progress to the semi-finals, where they will meet Manchester City. But for the north London side – who will have Tim Sherwood in charge once again for Sunday’s trip to Southampton – they look set to be without Townsend for a number of weeks as they attempt to recover from the sacking of manager Andre Villas-Boas.

Interim manager Sherwood confirmed that the England international faces a lengthy time on the sidelines, saying: “It looks like it. It looks like he pulled up with a hamstring.”

The 22-year-old limped off during the second half at White Hart Lane, and he is likely to miss matches against West Brom, Stoke and Manchester United, with the FA Cup third round against Arsenal following not long after on January 4.

Despite the former Spurs captain yet to confirm it, The Independent understands that Sherwood will remain in charge as chairman Daniel Levy makes up his mind on whether to stick with the 44-year-old or look elsewhere for the Lilywhites next permanent manager.

Sherwood threw his name in the hat for consideration following Wednesday’s defeat, admitting that although it was not his choice, he had to be in the frame for the job.

The immediate future is up in the air, that's as much as I know,” Sherwood explained.

“I'm up for a challenge. I always have been. I'm very opinionated. I know a certain way I need to play. I think I can manage men and deal with them and be honest with them.

“I think the chairman and the football club need to make the correct decision and find the manager who's best compatible to take this football club forward. I've got to be in the frame, but it's not my decision, unfortunately.”

In the build-up to his first game in charge, Sherwood admitted that he had been a bag of nerves, describing the 48 hours prior to kick-off as “madness” in his first taste of Premier League management.

“It's different,” he said. “I'm not used to sleeping two hours a night and waking up thinking about footballers.

“Someone asked me the other day, I said I slept like a baby, I woke up crying four times in the night.”