Student Studying a degree in Astronomy could see you work around the world, and even eventually in space

Why would anyone study Astronomy? I think the great, late Carl Sagan said it perfectly, "We are a way for the cosmos to know itself." It is in this that I cannot remember a time that I looked up at the night sky and was not taken aback by the sheer wonder of the cosmos.

Could you conceive of and design memorable and functional buildings? Architecture may be for you

What's it like to study... Architecture

Liam Houghton studied BA Architecture at the University of Westminster and was awarded First Class Honours. He writes that his experience was challenging but extremely useful

Politics is the study of power and how power works

What's it like to study... Politics

Tim Oliver studied BA Politics and International Relations at the University of Hull, and is now studying a PhD there

Egyptology takes you back thousands of years to explore an ancient civilisation - their texts, temples, and monuments. This is the Great Sphinx of Tanis, at the Louvre Museum in Paris

What's it like to study... Egyptology

Just over a decade ago, Gemma Smith decided she was going to be "the next Evelyn O’Connell". She has since graduated from Swansea University with a first class honours degree in Egyptology, and is about to start her MA in Ancient Egyptian Culture.

Studying a degree in Astronomy could see you work around the world, and even eventually in space

What's it like to study... Astronomy

Samuel Nathan Richards studied a BSc in Astronomy at the University of Hertfordshire

Is your university in a place more tumbleweed town than a midwestern film? More boring than Slough? There ARE things you can do, you just have to work harder to find them!

What is there to do when your university is in a boring place?

Not everyone gets to go to university in London and Manchester. In fact, some people can end up studying in pretty far-flung places. Katherine Burch shows you how to make your own fun

Face to face: Studying archaeology could give you the opportunity to carry out excavations and field-work at great historical sites like these mysterious stone heads on Easter Island

What's it like to study... Archaeology

Lawrence Shaw studied Archaeology Bsc at Bournemouth University. He explains why his degree experience was unforgettable

Gap years should be an unforgettable experience

Take time out after your exams to see more of the world and learn valuable new skills

Carter-Ruck's injunction, obtained in the High Court, related to an MP's question that mentioned a report into alleged toxic waste dumping by Trafigura

Law at university: to degree or not to degree?

A career in the law is prestigious and carries an enviable salary once you have completed training. Legal careers can include a wide variety of roles, from paralegals to judges, to ushers and researchers.

Accountancy: ‘You don’t have to be good at maths’

Russ Thorne dispels some of the myths about a career in accountancy

As an engineering student, you could study any topics from waste management and recycling, to water treatment

What's it like to study... Engineering

Cat Clarkson studies Environmental Engineering at The University of Nottingham and has been studying engineering for the last seven years

Freshers' week is hectic but a week to remember

Freshers' Guide: 17 things you need to know

The things to do - and not to do - during freshers' week

International Baccalaureate: The international qualification with a holistic approach

Russ Thorne takes a closer look at the growing popularity of the IB

Philosophy: Far more than a witty remark

Studying philosophy equips you with an adaptable mind and vital life skills, writes Russ Thorne

Helen Crane: Hey unis, leave our exams alone

As a student from a middling state school approaching the end of my time in higher education, I think A-level examinations set by university lecturers could be seriously damaging for both the aspirations and the achievements of those at less successful schools.

The UK is crying out for technology and science graduates

According to the recent Engineering UK 2012 report the UK is going to need a few more workers with skills in science, engineering and technology over the next five to 10 years. Some two million more, in fact, based on estimates from industry skills councils, which suggests now might be a good time to consider enrolling for a science, engineering or technology (SET) degree.

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Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine