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EasyJet flew more than 60 million passengers last year as more Britons spent Christmas overseas.

David Prosser: No reason to expect a soft landing

Outlook Iata's claim yesterday that an air traffic recovery may have begun will no doubt be welcomed by the global airline industry, but there was precious little evidence of any turnaround in the results of Aer Lingus, which were published almost simultaneously. Or, for that matter, in the downbeat demeanour of British Airways boss Willie Walsh in the interview he gave this paper earlier this week.

Aer Lingus reports €93m losses

Aer Lingus today reported losses of €93m for the first half of 2009 - almost four times the figure for the same period last year.

Willie Walsh: 'I didn't set out to be CEO but I love every minute of it'

The man steering British Airways' fight for survival is a workaholic with a hard-man reputation. Sarah Arnott reports

Fasten your seatbelts – there is even more turbulence ahead

As BA reports its first ever summer season loss, the lean winter months look worse than ever for the industry, reports Sarah Arnott

David Prosser: Another bout of bullying by Ryanair

Outlook There is a certain hypocrisy in Michael O'Leary blaming higher taxes and fees for his decision to cut Ryanair's capacity at Stansted this winter. If anyone knows about making a few bob from extra charges, it's this budget airline, and at least the Chancellor's plan to raise air passenger duty from £10 to £11 hasn't been obscured in a swath of small print.

Simon Calder: There's no better time to be a passenger

Owners of second homes around Bergerac, long-distance lovers with one partner in Bologna, and Polish physicians with families in Bydgoszcz: all will be alarmed by the apparent 40 per cent cut in the lifeline they have come to depend upon – cheap flights from Stansted. Yesterday Ryanair's chief executive, Michael O'Leary, blamed the "Scottish misers", as he described the Chancellor and Prime Minister, for his decision to re-deploy 16 of the 40 aircraft the airline has based at Stansted this summer. Labour's "tourist tax" – in reality, the Air Passenger Duty introduced by the last Tory chancellor, Ken Clarke – was accused of being jointly responsible for the cut of 40 per cent in flights, along with Spanish-owned BAA, for its refusal to negotiate on charges for using Britain's third-busiest airport.

Ryanair on the attack ahead of rival's AGM

The spat between Ryanair and Aer Lingus over the latter's non-executive directors' fees reached a new pitch yesterday in advance of a shareholder vote on the issue at tomorrow's annual general meeting.

Ryanair plunges to first ever loss following Aer Lingus writedowns

Ryanair reported its first ever loss yesterday, saying it was dragged into the red by a massive writedown on its stake in rival Aer Lingus.

David Prosser: BA staff must strap themselves in for serious turbulence

Outlook: The message from British Airways to its own staff could not have been much clearer yesterday: the 2,500 job cuts the airline made last year are just the beginning, whatever the consequences for industrial relations turn out to be. Make no mistake, however, there certainly will be consequences.

I feel your pain, says BA boss giving up a month's pay (£61k)

When Willie Walsh, the ruthless boss of British Airways, decides that he needs to make a self-sacrificing gesture, the rest of his staff know it is time to fasten their safety belts and grab the sick bags. There is turbulence ahead for the world's favourite airline.

Credit crisis diary: 07/03/2009

Grade's PR team should have done better

Retribution is swift at ITV. Michael Grade took a battering after unveiling the broadcaster's results earlier this week, with media outlets queuing up to suggest his recovery plans had failed. And after the failure of ITV's spinners to talk up the company, let alone Grade himself, guess which department is facing the axe first in the inevitable round of job cuts. That's right, nearly half of ITV's PR staff are now set for the chop.

Something To Declare: Austrian avalanche risk; Lincolnshire; the Costas

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Our guide to a year of great holidays

Don't let the puny pound and faltering economy ruin your plans. Whether it's a bargain-priced sunshine break in the Med or the luxury of a flat-bed flight to Sydney, there's never been a better time to book, says Simon Calder.
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