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Fellowes to give Agatha Christie the 'Downton' treatment

After breathing new life into ITV's Sunday night schedule with the hit period drama Downton Abbey, Julian Fellowes is planning to reinvigorate the image of Agatha Christie with a film adaptation of the whodunnit Crooked House.

Christopher Hirst: No mystery but plenty of intrigue

David Suchet played Poirot with a twinkle in his eye and a pertness to his waxed moustache

Is the real Midsomer Murders really so white?

The man behind ITV's 'Midsomer Murders' has been suspended for implying that rural England is the sole preserve of Anglo-Saxons. Tom Peck finds a very different picture in the town where it's filmed

Agatha Christie, the ivory statues and our own Indiana Jones

The British Museum has paid £1.2m for a set of ancient carvings discovered by the writer and her husband

The author, the philistine PM and a crusade with no happy ending

It may be one of the least likely (and wrong-headed) labours of literary love of our times. For nearly four years, Yann Martel, the acclaimed Canadian author of the Life of Pi, has been sending personally selected books to his Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, in the vague hope he might be enriched by them. Or at least read them.

Last Night's TV - Agatha Christie's Marple, ITV1; Coronation Street, ITV1

She's still on the right trail

Talking about Detective Fiction, By PD James

From Wilkie Collins in The Moonstone to Edith Ngaio Marsh, PD James applies the keen eye of her hero Adam Dalgleish to the foremost practitioners of the form.

Christie 'exorcised' herself of Poirot

The murder mystery writer Agatha Christie wanted to "exorcise herself" of Hercule Poirot, one of her most famous and enduring characters, her grandson has revealed.

HarperCollins secures Agatha Christie publishing rights

It is almost 85 years since the relationship between Agatha Christie and Collins publishers began with The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, one of the author's earliest and most famous works.

Forgotten Author No 57: Margery Allingham

I thought carefully about whether or not to include Margery Allingham in this column. She's hardly ever out of print, and many readers know her name, even if they haven't read her. However, very few of them have really got to grips with her books. The ones who have are passionate fans, and she has her own society which holds literary events throughout the year. For many years I had her wrongly pegged as an Agatha Christie knock-off, until I took time properly to read her prose.

On the agenda: XOYO; Brighton Comedy Festival; Agatha Christie Festival; London Fashion Week; London Design Festival;

Red, red, red: shades of Maybelline, herrings in Devon and painting the town in Old Street

Wikipedia springs 'Mousetrap' ending

Agatha Christie's fans and family join the protest against the revelation of theatre's best-kept secret

My Hamlet, Assembly Rooms, Edinburgh

"Who's there?" cries Hamlet on the battlements of Elsinore, kick-starting the greatest revenge tragedy in the language. "Who's there?" cries Linda Marlowe as an old cleaning lady, sweeping up back stage.

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Actors front row from left, Jared Leto, Jennifer Lawrence, Meryl Streep, Ellen DeGeneres, Bradley Cooper, Peter Nyongío Jr., and, second row, from left, Channing Tatum, Julia Roberts, Kevin Spacey, Brad Pitt, Lupita Nyongío and Angelina Jolie as they pose for a
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techCould new invention save millions in healthcare bills?
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David Moyes gets soaked
sport Moyes becomes latest manager to take part in the ALS challenge
Voices
A meteor streaks across the sky during the Perseid Meteor Shower at a wind farm near Bogdanci, south of Skopje, Macedonia, in the early hours of 13 August
voicesHagel and Dempsey were pure Hollywood. They only needed Tom Cruise, says Robert Fisk
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peopleEnglishman managed quintessential Hollywood restaurant Chasen's
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food + drinkHarrods launches gourmet food qualification for staff
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Michael Flatley prepares to bid farewell to the West End stage
danceMichael Flatley hits West End for last time alongside Team GB World champion Alice Upcott
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All this talk of an ‘apocalyptic’ threat is simply childish

Robert Fisk: All this talk of an ‘apocalyptic’ threat is simply childish

Chuck Hagel and Martin Dempsey were pure Hollywood. They only needed Tom Cruise
Mafia Dons: is the Camorra in control of the Granite City?

Mafia Dons: is the Camorra in control of the Granite City?

So claims an EU report which points to the Italian Mob’s alleged grip on everything from public works to property
Emmys look set to overhaul the Oscars as Hollywood’s prize draw

Emmys look set to overhaul the Oscars as Hollywood’s prize draw

Once the poor relation, the awards show now has the top stars and boasts the best drama
What happens to African migrants once they land in Italy during the summer?

What happens to migrants once they land in Italy?

Memphis Barker follows their trail through southern Europe
French connection: After 1,300 years, there’s a bridge to Mont Saint-Michel

French connection: After 1,300 years, there’s a bridge to Mont Saint-Michel

The ugly causeway is being dismantled, an elegant connection erected in its place. So everyone’s happy, right?
Frank Mugisha: Uganda's most outspoken gay rights activist on changing people's attitudes, coming out, and the threat of being attacked

Frank Mugisha: 'Coming out was a gradual process '

Uganda's most outspoken gay rights activist on changing people's attitudes, coming out, and the threat of being attacked
Radio 1 to hire 'YouTube-famous' vloggers to broadcast online

Radio 1’s new top ten

The ‘vloggers’ signed up to find twentysomething audience
David Abraham: Big ideas for the small screen

David Abraham: Big ideas for the small screen

A blistering attack on US influence on British television has lifted the savvy head of Channel 4 out of the shadows
Florence Knight's perfect picnic: Make the most of summer's last Bank Holiday weekend

Florence Knight's perfect picnic

Polpetto's head chef shares her favourite recipes from Iced Earl Grey tea to baked peaches, mascarpone & brown sugar meringues...
Horst P Horst: The fashion photography genius who inspired Madonna comes to the V&A

Horst P Horst comes to the V&A

The London's museum has delved into its archives to stage a far-reaching retrospective celebrating the photographer's six decades of creativity
Mark Hix recipes: Try our chef's summery soups for a real seasonal refresher

Mark Hix's summery soups

Soup isn’t just about comforting broths and steaming hot bowls...
Tim Sherwood column: 'It started as a three-horse race but turned into the Grand National'

Tim Sherwood column

I would have taken the Crystal Palace job if I’d been offered it soon after my interview... but the whole process dragged on so I had to pull out
Eden Hazard: Young, gifted... not yet perfect

Eden Hazard: Young, gifted... not yet perfect

Eden Hazard admits he is still below the level of Ronaldo and Messi but, after a breakthrough season, is ready to thrill Chelsea’s fans
Tim Howard: I’m an old dog. I don’t get too excited

Tim Howard: I’m an old dog. I don’t get too excited

The Everton and US goalkeeper was such a star at the World Cup that the President phoned to congratulate him... not that he knows what the fuss is all about
Match of the Day at 50: Show reminds us that even the most revered BBC institution may have a finite lifespan – thanks to the opposition

Tom Peck on Match of the Day at 50

The show reminds us that even the most revered BBC institution may have a finite lifespan – thanks to the opposition