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THE GUILLOTINE: No 47: JOHN OSBORNE

Twentieth-Century Classics That Won't Last

Interview: Frank Dobson - He laughs! He cries! He's really quite Frank!

Frank Dobson, what's he like? He enjoys a crude joke like the next man, but he's sensitive, too, and prone to tears. He's the face of New Labour in the London mayoral race, but it's a face that sports an Old Labour beard. And as for his policies for the capital: well, the only thing I'm sure he's sure about is that he's not going to abolish south London

Letter: Criminal neglect

MARK TIMLIN is unduly harsh on British crime writers ("Whodunnit? One of the ciphers", Culture, 29 August). While it is certainly kind of him to express such admiration for Yank mystery writers, American readers greatly appreciate British mystery writers, often with an obsessive ingenuity. Americans will routinely order Lindsey Davis's latest Marcus Didius Falco novel from London's Crime in Store because the British edition is published a full year ahead of the American edition.

Books: Whodunnit? One of the ciphers

Mark Timlin deplores the dismal state of British crime fiction and asks why Americans do it best

Miss Scarletts held for questioning

EVERY SECOND of every day somewhere in the world a man is brutally murdered. The method of killing may vary from a lead pipe to a candlestick, and the body is sometimes found in the library, other times in the billiard room. But the victim is always Dr Black.

Short Breaks: Murder most extravagant

They're making a killing on the Orient Express - just watch out for men in very heavy make-up

Brilliant from tubb to bottom

AUDIO BOOKS

Love, death and a chandelier

DEBUSSY'S PELLEAS ET MELISANDE GLYNDEBOURNE

Daggers drawn as Black Leather Jackets take on the Blue Rinses

Stay away from the crime-writers' AGM tonight. It'll be absolute murder. By Jane Jakeman

Whodunit wife denies murder

THE WEEKEND was meant as a Valentine's Day getaway for couples with a taste for murder mysteries. The highlight was an Agatha Christie- style whodunit performed by amateur actors, with the audience participating to identify the killer. The play was a hit. However, within hours a guest was found dead.

Strange case of the exploding town

BAWTRY IS a most unlikely location for a series of unexplained bomb blasts. It is a genteel little commuter town in Yorkshire where the most interesting thing that happens is the afternoon gossip between the ladies at the Town House Tea Rooms. But last Monday, a bomb blew up a white van parked outside the White Hart pub. Exactly one week earlier, another bomb destroyed a telephone booth in the town. Police say the devices were powerful enough to have killed a passer-by and that it was "pure luck" that there were no casualties.

Obituary: Peter Cotes

TO BE remembered solely as the director of The Mousetrap might seem a humiliating destiny for a man of Peter Cotes's wide-ranging and often courageous talent. He gave theatre-goers some of the most remarkable nights of their life, especially when his wife the actress Joan Miller played the lead or one of his favourite actors, Wilfrid Lawson, played Strindberg's The Father.

Death at the Grand: a tale straight out of Agatha Christie

SEASIDE RESORTS can be melancholy places out of season, and Torquay on the "English Riviera" is no exception.

Obituary: Joan Hickson

THE OLDEST actress ever to take the lead in a major television series, Joan Hickson was a sprightly 78 when she was chosen to play the role for which she will be best remembered, Agatha Christie's spinster detective Miss Marple. It was the first of 12 murder mysteries in a television series that was to run for eight years, ending only when Hickson insisted on retiring at the age of 86.

Joan `Miss Marple' Hickson dies

Joan `Miss Marple' Hickson dies
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence