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See below to watch the trailers for this week's DVD and Blu-Ray releases

Lockout (15)

Starring: Guy Pearce, Maggie Grace, Peter Stormare

Michael Douglas as Gordon Gekko in 'Wall Street'

Gordon Gekko turns his back on greed for the FBI

The FBI has enlisted an unlikely ally in its fight against insider trading and securities fraud: Gordon Gekko, the villainous executive from 1987 movie Wall Street, who told an audience of potential investors: "Greed, for want of a better word, is good."

DVD: Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (12)

Harry Potter's film incarnation can now settle where he belongs – the pre-Christmas shopping melee.

DVD: Paul Blart - Mall Cop

This so-so comedy starsKevin James as a rotundshopping-mall securityguard who falls overrepeatedly while tacklinga gang of skateboardingcrooks. Essentially abelated Die Hard pastiche,it's as uninspired as themall it's set in, but it'shalfway palatable thanksto James' likeable, bigheartedperformance,and at least it's free of thegross-out gags and misanthropythat drag downmost films produced byAdam Sandler. Believe itor not, it's one of thisyear's biggest US boxofficehits so far.

Bottle Shock (12A)

To wine buffs the 1976 blind-tasting of the old-world French and the brash new Californians as organised by the Academie du Vin's Steven Spurrier is a landmark.

Words: Sensible

AS HE sped down the M4's bus lane last week past a tailback of frustrated motorists, many of them no doubt floating voters, Tony Blair had time to wonder whether the bus lane was such a fine idea after all. But it had seemed right at the time; "sensible" was the word he had used about it a fortnight earlier, a good steady word. One was reminded of the old electioneering slogan "You know it makes sense". We expect our politicians to be sensible, whatever else they are.

Letters in brief

I WAS disgusted to read of the behaviour of individuals attached to Heythrop Hunt ("Hunt tramples Churchill's grave", 7 February). This appalling incident will, I hope, finally persuade people that hunting ought to be banned.

Essay: Death is hard, but there's life in it

`Die Hard' copycats can set their own body count, says Daniel Rosenthal, but they should leave the rules alone

Theatre Review: Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra

Classical music: How to make an opera that sings

The creators of `Hey Persephone!' have never worked with opera. Are they a dream team or a recipe for disaster?

Letter: Rickman says sorry

Letter: Rickman says sorry

POP Einsturzende Neubaten Astoria, London

Einsturzende Neubauten's singer and instigator Blixa Bargeld once wanted to extinguish music, to press at the borders of what music was till it evaporated, and he could start again. It was an obsessional project that suited the bleak, Berlin Wall-dominated landscape in which his band worked, and the instruments they used, industrial debris from chainsaws to hammers. In their early Eighties heyday, the mere thought of sitting through one of their concerts was terrifying, so extreme were their experiments. But the band's existence is more peripheral than ever these days, its one-time shocking newness surely obsolete. The people who still want them, even need them, the people who crowd this gig, would look obsolete themselves in any other context, lost tribes of post-punks and other audio refuseniks. Fortunately, Bargeld and his cohorts have not forgotten the manifesto they began with. This gig proves what their new album Ende Neu indicated: that their effort to destroy music is over, and that the new music they searched for is in their grasp.

The Big Fella

Michael Collins Neil Jordan (15)

Artspeople: Lloyd Webber fanfare produces play on words

Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber rewrote theatrical history this week when he announced that his revived musical Jesus Christ Superstar will reopen the Lyceum Theatre in London and that the Lyceum "celebrates its return to live theatre production after a 56-year absence".
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
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3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
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Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn