Life and Style Models present creations by Emporio Armani at the Fall/Winter 2014 Men's collection

The twenty-first century habit of instantly recording a show and broadcasting the results across social media is damaging to fashion - but some designers aren't playing ball

Try me: THE ARMANI SUIT

It's not what you wear, but where you wear it.

Designers admit paying tax police

THE TWO stars of Italian fashion, Gianni Versace and Giorgio Armani, look set to extend their well-known catwalk rivalry into the murky world of Italian corruption.

Gianni in wonderland: Gianni Versace revels in his reputation as the brash, flash Loadsamoney of international fashion designers. Recently, however, people have begun to ask awkward questions about his success

A ROLLING, red tongue of a carpet curls out of Gianni Versace's Milan headquarters in the Via Gesu licks past the sentinel of potted bay trees and spills across the pavement right into the road. Under the klieg lights at either side, guys in black T-shirts - sleeves rolled up into tight little cigars to show off their biceps - are chewing gum and yelling at the assembled photographers. They are Versace's gang, and part of their job tonight will be to stop the photographers from muckying the rug. 'Dai ragazzi. Dai ragazzi,' they yell, pushing the cameramen back against the wall. 'Not on the carpet. Dai]'

Seventies tackiness comes unstuck

THE trouble with fashion is that it can make you feel so old. You live through a look once, then you find yourself forced to live through the re-run. You have to stop yourself muttering, 'of course, I wanted hot pink stretch jeans back in 1976' or all the hip fashion chicks living the look for the first time raise their eyes to the heavens.

Armani admits paying bribes to taxmen

GIORGIO ARMANI, one of Italy's most successful fashion designers, yesterday admitted paying kickbacks after being interrogated by magistrates investigating the bribing of tax officials.

Would David have looked even better in Armani?: Leisl Schillinger reads a dissertation on the sexiness of men in suits

TOGA? Sexy. Prayer gown? Not sexy. Coat of mail? Sexy. Coat of many colours? Not sexy. Armani suit? Sexy. Birthday suit? Not sexy.

In Thing: String bikini from Giorgio Armani

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water - the string bikini returns.

Etc . . .: Five white cotton T-shirts

FIVE WHITE COTTON T-SHIRTS:

Letter: Beyond the pale

Sir: I have looked despairingly at the morasse of sludge (pale) and drudge (paler) that the high street is offering us mousey-haired matrons - never mind those who are looking at designer labels ('Dear Giorgio Armani', 17 May).

Dear Giorgio Armani: Please, please design us something red . . . . we pasty Brits pale into insignificance in beastly, boring beige, says the Independent's fashion writer

Look what you've gone and done. Ever since you started designing in 1975, beige has been your trade-mark colour - now everybody is using it. Robert De Niro might look like a million lire dressed in his impeccable beige suits, but what about the rest of us? Beige is not a shade that goes well with sun-starved British pastiness. So why do we now have to look at it in every shop on the high street? Why, more to the point, are so many of us wearing it? Let's face it, if you are not De Niro, beige looks at best like sackcloth, at worst like there has been an accident with a mug of tea.

Fashion: The girl in the white suit

Tiny skirts are fine if you're 16 and built like a twig, If you are not, but you are bored with wearing the ankle-skimming alternatives, a white trouser suit is the answer. Happily, wherever you see a micro-mini this summer, a white trouser suit will not be far away. Of the high street stores, Oasis and French Connection have come up with some that are well-proportioned and reasonably priced. If you want the best, go to Armani. But don't forget, trouser suits date dangerously quickly (lapels, trousers, waists change every year), so best not think of this as an investment, just a one-summer thing.

Armani returns with simplicity

LAST SEASON, Armani out-Armanied himself to produce a collection of fluent, exquisitely embellished moderation, writes Alison Veness. It was a hard act to follow.

Why fatherhood means never having to buy an Armani suit

IT USED to be easy to understand clothes and what they meant. There were those who wore nylon shirts and V-necked jumpers that their mums had bought; the rest of us wore bell-bottom jeans, Oxford bags, greatcoats, platforms, scoop-necked T-shirts, lurid jumpers with stars and stripes on them. As long as the clothes had been purchased from somewhere obviously fashionable - Kensington Market, say, or Harry Fenton (and I swear to you that in 1973, in my town, Harry Fenton was the place to be on a Saturday), or the mail-order section in the back of Melody Maker - you couldn't go wrong. The only places to avoid, really, were Marks and Sparks, Tesco, department stores and the shop where you bought your school uniform.

Fashion: Le smoking, just le thing pour le soir: A stylish evening jacket and trousers offer freedom from big jewellery and high heels. Kate Constable reports

Most designers work on the premise of 'planned obsolescence'. But when Yves Saint Laurent put women into dinner jackets and trousers in the autumn of 1966 with his first 'Le Smoking', he made planned obsolescence obsolete.
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