News Tony Gallagher was given a traditional 'banging out' send off by the paper's staff

The Daily Telegraph has sacked its editor, Tony Gallagher, and declared it will “reinvent the way we work” and move beyond news publishing.

pounds 350,000 deal exposes the murky world of chequebook journalism

JAMES HEWITT, a former lover of Diana, Princess of Wales, was said by friends yesterday to be still hopeful of finding a newspaper to serialise his memoirs after the collapse of a pounds 600,000 deal with the Mail on Sunday.

Any old Sunday?

The highly successful `Mail on Sunday' has been relaunched. It's certainly new, but is it improved?

Murdoch drops plan to ambush `Mail' freesheet

PLANS BY News International to spike the launch of London's first new newspaper for more than a decade appeared yesterday to have been put on ice.

Media: Mail goes down the Tube

Associated's launch of Metro, available free at Underground stations, is an important test.

First shots fired in London newspaper war

Rivals ready to act as Associated Newspapers nears launch date of free daily tabloid. Hilary Clarke reports

Letter: Is the hunt antique pageantry or sentimental sadism?

A FOX dies instantly when it is caught by a pack of hounds, claims Roger Scruton. On the following day the Daily Mail printed an account of a cat that had been savaged to death by a pack of hounds. It certainly did not die instantly. It must be a very clever hound that can tell a cat from a fox.

Hague drops plan to hire ex-editor

A REARGUARD action by senior Tory party staff yesterday persuaded William Hague to drop his plan for hiring Jonathan Holborow as the chief "spin doctor" at Conservative Central Office.

Former editor is Hague's new hope

The media: Tories target former `Mail on Sunday' chief to help revive fortunes as gays find a new voice in the press

Media: Max has failed to set the Standard

The Neil Report

Media: Analysis: `Mail' shrugs off Diana effect

LAST YEAR, everyone from radio stations to retailers blamed the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, for a downturn in business. Now, for perhaps the first time in its relationship with the late Princess, the newspaper industry can claim the same thing. September 1997 will for ever be Diana month, and September 1998's sales figures look terrible when compared with last year.

Media: Dacre starts to reveal his hand at Associated

Who is Peter Wright? A Dacre man, that's who. By Darius Sanai

Dacre makes move at Mail

THE HOUSE of Rothermere yesterday moved into a new era with the replacement of Mail on Sunday editor Jonathan Holborow with Peter Wright, the deputy editor of the Daily Mail.

Obituary: Viscount Rothermere

VERE HARMSWORTH, the third Viscount Rothermere, was an exception to any number of rules, most notably that newspaper dynasties seldom survive the second generation. Associated Newspapers, and its flagship the Daily Mail, were founded a century ago by his great-uncle, Lord Northcliffe, and still remain in the family. Under Rothermere, the Mail and its Sunday sister have come to dominate the lucrative middle segment of the newspaper market.

Rothermere, the last press baron, is dead

LORD ROTHERMERE, chairman of Associated Newspapers and scion of the last great press dynasty, died of a heart attack in London late on Monday at the age of 73, just three months after the death of Sir David English, editor-in-chief of Associated's Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday and Evening Standard.

Woodward cash row grows

SUPPORTERS of the former au pair Louise Woodward said yesterday they had no knowledge of the whereabouts of the pounds 40,000 paid to the family by a tabloid newspaper.
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003