Arts and Entertainment

Could Japanese Godzilla beat American Godzilla? And how big is the Starship Enterprise? At last, some answers...

Letter: Titanic injustice

THE FILM, Titanic gives an unfair portrayal of my grandfather, Bruce Ismay, chairman of the White Star Line. Please allow me to set the record straight.

'Our ley-line runs from the top of Glastonbury Tor through our garden and my bed'

Dulwich Art Gallery has pulled off a coup in getting those two legal eagles and bosom buddies, Cherie Blair and Hillary Clinton, to be joint Honorary Patrons of the first-ever exhibition devoted to the works of 17th-century Dutch artist Pieter de Hooch. An innovatory painter of interiors, de Hooch has long been overshadowed by his great contemporary, Vermeer, and fully merits this review, which will travel to Connecticut after the Dulwich show in the autumn. I wonder, however, if America's First Lady is aware that de Hooch's subject matter is somewhat racier than his irreproachably worthy colleague? As one study of his work notes: "He turned to genre paintings showing young men and women ... flirting in well-appointed interiors." Female figures appear in more than 25 of the 40 paintings due to be shown. If Hillary manages to drag Bill along from his onerous duties in the Oval Office, the Presidential couple would be well advised to avoid being photographed next to A Soldier Offering a Glass of Wine to a Seated Woman. Perhaps A Woman Delousing a Child's Hair might be more appropriate.

Cinema: Kate Winslet: the sinking man's crumpet

TITANIC (12) is one of the most spectacular films ever made. It's also one of the most badly written. And yet, despite the abyss between James Cameron's meagre screenwriting talents and the apocalyptic grandeur of his direction, Titanic stays afloat. The dialogue may be unspeakable, but the film remains unsinkable.

Worse things happen at sea

Despite early hype predicting box-office disaster to match that of `Waterworld', `Titanic' is now the hot tip to clean up at the Oscars. Billy Zane, one of the film's stars, recalls life on-board

Film: I've got that sinking feeling

the big picture

Film: Celluloid symphonies

James Horner has become the Mozart of movies, providing the scores for films from `Braveheart' to his latest, `Titanic'. Edward Seckerson charts the career of Hollywood's top scorer.

Film: Whenever you get that sinking feeling, get busy

Director James Cameron has been haunted by death since he was a boy. His latest film, `Titanic', is about two-and-a-half hours in the life of people who know they face death. He tells Nick Hasted about his `metaphor for mortality'.

Myths that leave a sinking feeling

The 'Titanic' has become a myth. Every time the word Titanic comes up, the word myth is never far away - and not just because the latest Hollywood blockbuster about the doomed ship is the most expensive film ever. James Mckenzie visited Hamburg, site of Europe's largest Titanic exhibition and met the show's historian, Gunther Babler, in an attempt to separate myth from reality, fact from fiction.

A film to remember

THERE IS a thriving market already in props used in the making of Titanic, which is perhaps the most bizarre measure of the extraordinary success of this $200m Hollywood movie. In the three weeks since it opened in America, Titanic has ceased to be a mere epic and has become a phenomenon. It may well turn out to be an epic phenomenon, quite apart from being the most extravagant movie ever made - perhaps the last of its kind.

Network: The Starship Titanic? Its only mission is to make you think

Too many of today's computer games involve extreme violence or mindless fun. Now Douglas Adams has done the unthinkable - created a game that actually requires players to engage their brains as well as their joysticks. Tim Green talks to the author of `The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy' about his latest project.

Going back to the future

Sunderland's move to a new 40,000-seat ground in August is a going- home - of sorts. Not that any Rokerites are sufficiently long in the tooth to recognise it as such, writes Simon Turnbull.

For those with Beryl on the sea

Peter Parker reviews an exhilarating new novel about the Titanic disaster; Every Man For Himself by Beryl Bainbridge Duckworth, pounds 14.99

Graves, the new destination

Should we go sightseeing at the Titanic? Godfrey Hodgson asks when we may break an ancient taboo

'It would be cheaper to lower the Atlantic'

(So said Lew Grade in 1979. Yesterday the pounds 3.3m operation to rais e the Titanic was abandoned)

The good, the bad and the retro

Tales from the Crypt (18) Ernest Dickerson Somebody to Love (15) Alexandre Rockwell Nana (no cert) Jean Renoir
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Bruges
Lake Como
Burgundy
South AFrica
Paris
Northern Corsica
Prices correct as of 21 November 2014
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible
Look what's mushrooming now! Meat-free recipes and food scandals help one growing sector

Look what's mushrooming now!

Meat-free recipes and food scandals help one growing sector
Neil Findlay is more a pink shrimp than a red firebrand

More a pink shrimp than a red firebrand

The vilification of the potential Scottish Labour leader Neil Findlay shows how one-note politics is today, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Tenderstem broccoli omelette; Fried eggs with Mexican-style tomato and chilli sauce; Pan-fried cavolo nero with soft-boiled egg

Oeuf quake

Bill Granger's cracking egg recipes
Terry Venables: Wayne Rooney is roaring again and the world knows that England are back

Terry Venables column

Wayne Rooney is roaring again and the world knows that England are back
Michael Calvin: Abject leadership is allowing football’s age-old sores to fester

Abject leadership is allowing football’s age-old sores to fester

Those at the top are allowing the same issues to go unchallenged, says Michael Calvin