News A container reportedly used to transport cobalt-60 was found in a truck in the town of Hueypoxtla

Officials have begun the delicate task of recovering a stolen shipment of highly radioactive cobalt-60 abandoned in a field in central Mexico.

<i>IoS</i> letters, emails & texts, 2 August 2008

Feargal Sharkey makes an emotive appeal on behalf of session musicians ("Noises Off", 27 July), but the main beneficiaries of any copyright extension, as always, will be the record companies. When he talks of session musicians' rights being "bought out" at the time of recording, this usually means they are assigned to a record company in exchange for a sum of money. It is the record company that benefits from future airplay.

Sean O'Grady: A missed chance to give world a tax cut

Are they dead or just resting on their perch? The collapse of the world trade talks is easily dismissed as one of those great diplomatic routines, an annual ritual of late nights, sweaty, exhausted trade ministers trading the odd insult, in between wrangles about banana quotas. "Make or break" negotiations collapse in a red-eyed heap on the conference floor. Then they squawk back into life the next year and the cycle goes on. So we have learnt to filter them out as background noise to other, more vital global tussles. And yet these talks matter hugely.

Letters: Eccentric English

Millions struggle with the eccentric spelling of English

Leading article: A missed opportunity to feed the world

Despite some furious final-day haggling, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation summit in Rome looked destined to end last night with the usual platitudinous declarations of concern from delegates.

The toxic 'wonder plant' that split world food summit

It's no beauty queen – the stems are long, scrawny and leafless and the pods dangle from the twigs like scorched testicles. Untreated, the seeds are so poisonous that as few as three can kill, while even a small amount induces nausea – hence the jatropha plant's nickname, "black vomit nut".

VCTs plough $360m into biofuels

Venture capital investment in crop-based biofuels reached $360m (£180m) worldwide in the first quarter, despite fears that the industry is taking farmland away from food production.

Letters: Train travel

Council finds ways to take the strain out of train travel

Letters: Biofuels

Why biofuels could actually mean more CO2 emissions

Daniel Howden: Brazil's experience testifies to the downside of this energy revolution

The apostles of biofuels would have us believe that the congested streets of Sao Paulo offer a glimpse of a better future. There, traffic jams are made of flex-fuel cars that run off a growing menu of bio and fossil fuel mixtures and all filling stations offer "alcohol" and "gas" at the pump.

Energy Industry: End of biofuel subsidy 'only serves to muddy Whitehall's position'

The Government will pocket £550m from the cancellation of a biofuels subsidy programme in a move that the energy industry said was indicative of a package of energy and climate change policies that muddied Whitehall's stance on the issues.

Africans unite in calling for immediate moratorium on switch from food to fuel

Scientists and NGOs across Africa are calling for a moratorium on new biofuels projects as millions of acres of prime agricultural land in sub-Saharan Africa are switched from food to fuel.

Hidden victims of the 'green revolution'

Biofuels are nothing new to Simeon Mayimel. He's been burning charcoal and elephant dung for years. He had never expected that they would change his or his people's way of life.

Michael McCarthy: 'Free lunch' that could cost the earth

When biofuels burst onto the environment scene a few years ago, they seemed to be that rarest of phenomena: the free lunch.

Biofuels make climate change worse, scientific study concludes

Growing crops to make biofuels results in vast amounts of carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere and does nothing to stop climate change or global warming, according to the first thorough scientific audit of a biofuel's carbon budget.

Volvo C30 1.8F SE Sport - The Verdict

Are we ready for these fuelish things?: Bioethanol could help save the planet - if you can find a pump. David Wilkins and our testers try it out in a Volvo C30

Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary
Legoland Windsor's master model-makers reveal the tricks of their trade (including how to stop the kids wrecking your Eiffel Tower)

Meet the people who play with Lego for a living

They are the master builders: Lego's crack team of model-makers, who have just glued down the last of 650,000 bricks as they recreate Paris in Windsor. Susie Mesure goes behind the scenes
The 20 best days out for the summer holidays: From Spitfires to summer ferry sailings

20 best days out for the summer holidays

From summer ferry sailings in Tyne and Wear and adventure days at Bear Grylls Survival Academy to Spitfires at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and bog-snorkelling at the World Alternative Games...
Open-air theatres: If all the world is a stage, then everyone gets in on the act

All the wood’s a stage

Open-air productions are the cue for better box-office receipts, new audiences, more interesting artistic challenges – and a picnic
Rand Paul is a Republican with an eye on the world

Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

Rand Paul is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Self-preservation society: Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish

Self-preservation society

Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
Generation gap opens a career sinkhole

Britons live ever longer, but still society persists in glorifying youth

We are living longer but considered 'past it' younger, the reshuffle suggests. There may be trouble ahead, says DJ Taylor