Richard Garner: The genetics route could spell a new direction for education

Linking the words "genetics" and "education" can bring the hardiest of educationists out in a rash.

The study compared the academic performance of identical and non-identical twin

Nature trumps nurture in exam success: GCSE results 'mainly determined by genes,' says landmark study of twins

Conclusion that teachers are less important than biology sparks outrage, as researchers call for national curriculum to be abandoned in favour of personalised lesson plans

There were fears of potential conflicts of interest among the companies that considered bids to run the body

Dead in the water: MoD shake-up plans ditched

The Government's project to 'privatise' the £15bn defence agency that buys the armed forces' tanks and submarines is shelved

Better late than never: 90-year-old grandmother waits seven decades to graduate from University of Manchester after WW2 got in the way

Gene Hetherington finally collects her BA in Commerce at a ceremony alongside her 23-year-old granddaughter

Mark Hunt in action

MMA: UFC heavyweights Mark Hunt and Antonio 'Bigfoot' Silva in fight for the ages

Brisbane witnessed a battle that will be long remembered

Bill Burr performs on stage in Los Angeles

Schools guilty of gender stereotyping, researchers claim

Half of state-funded schools in England are paying too little attention to the way gender stereotypes influence subject choices, researchers have claimed.

New research into the 'deep biosphere' indicates that the first replicating life-forms on the planet may have originated deep underground

Life on Earth may have developed below rather than above ground, reveal scientists

New research into the “deep biosphere” indicates that the first replicating life-forms on the planet may have originated deep underground

If all people lived in isolation for a year, would we wipe out all contagious diseases?’

Each person is teeming with bacteria, and we have a lot of viruses, too. A lot of the bacteria that live on and in our bodies can cause disease even if they aren't causing problems at the moment (for instance, E coli in the gut). So, no way. If each person lived in isolation for a year they'd still come out teeming with germs. But maybe it would theoretically wipe out some certain pathogen – I can't think of any, though. We actually need our bacteria, a lot of what goes on is a symbiotic relationship.

New prosthetic arm offers users the ability to feel what they touch

'Cuff electrodes' connect the prosthetic hand  to the amputee's nerves

Harvard under scrutiny: are its students' grades over-generous?

'If this is true... it represents a failure on the part of this faculty and its leadership to maintain our academic standards' says college professor

Cannabis can cause man boobs, US surgeon claims

Worries about those man boobs? Then ‘put out that joint’, says Dr Anthony Youn

Male contraceptive pill brought a step closer

The new approach, which involves blocking the release of sperm brings scientists closer to developing an effective male pill

Brain networks in males (upper) and in females (lower)

The hardwired difference between male and female brains could explain why men are 'better at map reading'

And why women are 'better at remembering a conversation'

A Parliamentary investigation has begun into the risk of hospitals spreading the human form of 'mad cow' disease

Commons committee launch investigation into potential spread of vCJD brain disease in hospitals

A Parliamentary investigation has begun into the risk of hospitals spreading the human form of “mad cow” disease as a result of failing to detect the infective agent responsible for the variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in tissue donations and on surgical instruments.

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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

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Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
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A Bible for billionaires

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Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
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Magna Carta Island goes on sale

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The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

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We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

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The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

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