News An email exchange in April 2011 between Rebekah Brooks and her husband, Charles Brooks, referred to her losing an iPad

One phone on the list may have been a duplicate, another may have belonged to someone else and one iPad may have been lost

Riots Q&A: What really happened? And, what happens next?

Why did this happen?

John Rentoul: There is still a case for police cuts

David Cameron is very brave, or very foolish, to take on the police, but the argument for reform remains strong

'People came out just because they're broke'

Rioter's view

Howard Jacobson: They may be criminals, but we're the ones who have created them

That form of looting known as corporate larceny continues to rage unchecked

Teenager on Blackberry riot charge

An 18-year-old woman has been charged with using BlackBerry messaging to encourage others to take part in violence.

Leading article: The Prime Minister's draconian gimmicks

The call for wider curfew powers is straight off the autocrat's traditional wish list

Why has the BlackBerry Messenger become the communication device of choice for British teenagers?

Everyone in Edmonton Enfield Wood Green everywhere in north link up at Enfield Town station at 4 o'clock sharp," was one message passed around by BlackBerry messenger users in north London on Sunday. So why has the mobile of the city professional become the communication device of choice for British teenagers? And which communication devices are being used by other demographics? And why?

Leading article: Britain has experienced its Katrina moment

At the weekend the levees burst and we have been witnessing the ugly results

Mark Steel: Imagine the Bastille with BlackBerrys

At least there's one way in which the police seem to be improving. If the recently deposed Inspector Yates was still in charge he'd have said, "I've had a look and can see no evidence there's been any riots, so there'll be no arrests."

Chaos in new urban battleground as violence erupts in North

Thick black choking smoke blew down Market Street, one of the main shopping thoroughfares in Manchester last night, as the city caught the contagion of rioting that is sweeping through Britain. The Miss Selfridge shop had been set alight, only one of around 100 shops smashed and burned as upwards of 2,000 rioters rampaged through the city centre streets.

Diary: The jewel in Madonna's crown?

A pleasant diversion from the current nastiness is in store, courtesy of Madonna, whose eagerly awaited (if only because everyone expects it to be hilariously awful) Wallis Simpson biopic W.E. will finally get an airing at the Toronto Film Festival next month – once Harvey Weinstein has finished his reportedly extensive re-cut. Madonna's previous brushes with cinema have been less than well received (eg, Swept Away), but a Grazia magazine source has seen an early screening and claims the film is "very pretty" and "looks nice", both of which are up there with "the lighting was good" in the faint praise stakes. Moreover, Ms Madonna has taken a few liberties with the historical record: in the film, Mrs Simpson loses an unborn baby when she is assaulted by her first husband; King Edward spikes the drinks at a party to "ramp up the high-jinks factor"; and the former dances the twist for the latter as he lies on his deathbed. None of these incidents is believed to have occurred. Still, The King's Speech was criticised by some for its inaccuracies, and its director won an Oscar. Stranger things have happened. (Not many, though.)

Hackney town hall evacuated

A town hall has been evacuated and closed amid fears of riot attacks.

'Mindless violence' spreads to Liverpool, Leeds and Birmingham

Embattled police struggled to contain a third night of riots, looting and arson as David Cameron cut short his holiday to chair a session of Cobra, the emergency co-ordination committee, scheduled for this morning.

BlackBerry looks for boost from launches

Mobile phone manufacturer Research in Motion (RIM) announced its "biggest ever launch" of BlackBerry handsets yesterday, days after it said it was cutting 2,000 jobs.

Susie Rushton: Don't kid us you're in charge

We've all had one. A boss who insists on holding the reins of power even when they're on holiday. Even though the office is perfectly capable of operating without him/her. Even though, if crisis should strike, there would be no way they could possibly be on top of all the facts from the terrace of their Ibizan apartamento or their Cornish refuge.

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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

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Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
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Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
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Army general planning to come out
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Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

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The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
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As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

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A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
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Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

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These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

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A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
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Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project