Iraq Inquiry report delayed by secrecy row

The Iraq Inquiry has delayed its report by at least six months as it argues with the Government over the release of top-secret documents.

Album: Meshell Ndegeocello, Weather (Naive)

Producer Joe Henry writes a brilliant sleevenote arguing that great artists transcend genre.

People are hankering for the romance of vinyl again

Vinyl finds its groove with young music lovers

Sales are at a 10-year high, record players are back

Rex Features

Givers, XOYO, London

Afro-pop folk band Givers don't have a slogan, but if they did it would be "It's nice to be nice". The singers, Taylor Guarisco and Tiffany Lamson perform with the emphatic smiles of drama school children in panto. Their music is uplifting; to watch them is like watching happy Muppets dancing around, on ecstasy. They're aggressively happy – they bounce, and wiggle and gyrate and smile a lot. They even use the break between songs to tell us how much they love London ("I love that you drive on the left here. I really do," says Lamson).

Album: Etta James, The Dreamer (Decca)

Assailed by the double debilitations of leukemia and dementia, and requiring hospital care, Etta James has sensibly decided that The Dreamer will constitute the final chapter of her recording career.

Battle songs: The Somme

Requiem for an art form: Why modern composers are fighting a losing battle

War has always inspired great music, says Jessica Duchen, but since 9/11 classical has fallen behind pop in a world racked by conflict

Nicki Minaj to release songs as alter-ego

The rapper has revealed she plans to "address the nation" in several new songs as the invented character, who she introduced to fans on 'Roman's Revenge', the opening track of her debut album 'Pink Friday' which was co-written by Eminem. 

The Four Girls in 1954: from left, Jane Russell, Davis, Rhonda Fleming and Connie Haines

Beryl Davis: Singer who worked with Sinatra, Miller, Reinhardt and Grappelli

The British song stylist, Beryl Davis, was never as acclaimed as her favourite singer, Ella Fitzgerald, but she had a momentous career working with Django Reinhardt, Glenn Miller and Frank Sinatra. In the 1920s, Oscar Rabin ran one of the UK's top dance bands but he preferred to play saxophone and have the band led by Harry Davis, a showman who sang and played guitar and banjo. Harry's wife, Queenie, would tour with him and their daughter, Beryl, was born in the Palace Theatre, Plymouth in 1924.

Album: Susan Boyle, Someone to Watch Over Me (SYCO)

The Subo story is a feel-good potboiler brought to life: dowdy Scottish introvert turns up at Britain's Got Talent to initial audience titters, but wows the world with her untutored perfect pitch and West End-worthy projection.

Sulk's new single sets them far above other 1990s revivalists

Wilco, Roundhouse, London

The masters of reinvention are still inspiring a whole lot of love

Tom Hodgkinson: Want to feel inspired? Look to the punks

Sometimes you need to get out of your own country to be reminded of your own history. I spent last weekend in Brno, a city in Moravia in the east of the Czech Republic. I was speaking to 500 vaguely alternative young parents at a parenting conference organised by a group of radical political activists. On the day I left, the organisers were taking part in a demonstration against government plans to ban home births.

Cummins (left) says of Hook: 'He got really angry, saying my band was a joke and I should give our spot to them'

How We Met: Kevin Cummins & Peter Hook

Peter Hook, 55

Bolshoi reopens after six year closure

For the first time in six years, the strains of Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov and Prokofiev rang out from the orchestra pit at the Bolshoi last night, as Russia's most famous theatre reopened after a six-year closure.

Album: Professor Green, At Your Inconvenience (Virgin)

Having managed to parlay an association with Lily Allen into the semblance of a career, Professor Green punches above his weight on his second album, with tracks indulging the standard hip-hop tropes of self-aggrandisation ("At Your Inconvenience") and aimless antagonism ("DPMO (Don't Piss Me Off)").

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Lake Garda
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Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
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China's influence on fashion

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Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

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UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

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Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

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Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

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Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

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