Arts and Entertainment Paul McGuinness at the 'Breakfast on Pluto' film premiere in Dublin, 2006

Band manager is stepping down at the age of 62. Nick Hasted looks back at an incredible career

Diary: Writing on wall for Bono

Bono – singer, activist, hotelier, sometime newspaper editor and investor in "arguably the worst run institutional fund of any size in the United States" – is mired in controversies over his anti-poverty foundation, ONE, and ethical fashion house, Edun.

Can Spider-Man, world's most expensive musical, spin its magic?

It's written by Bono, and features spectacular stunts, but ticket sales cause concern

Diary: Paul Hewson for PM

While Blair was long convinced that Brown would be a poor prime minister, he seems to have no such compunction about recommending Bono for a similar role. The U2 frontman, Blair writes (on page 555), "could have been a president or prime minister standing on his head. He had an absolutely natural gift for politicking, was great with people, very smart and an inspirational speaker... motivated by an abundant desire to keep on improving, never really content or relaxed. I knew he would work with George [W Bush] well, and with none of the prissy disdain of most of his ilk". Bono's nationality (not to say his tax arrangements) would preclude him from leading a British political party. One assumes he would also have to revert to his real name, Paul Hewson, to be taken seriously in high office. But familiarity with the world of finance would surely qualify him for leadership in Ireland: his investment fund, Elevation Partners, has been described as "arguably the worst run institutional fund of any size in the United States".

Star names try to beat slump in eco-clothing

Can Chrissie Hynde buck the downward trend?

U2 deliver subtle dig to Medvedev in Moscow

When a huge rock band with strong political interests played in Russia for the first time, the results were never likely to be sedate.

Michael Been: Frontman of the acclaimed Eighties alternative rock band The Call

The lead singer, bassist and primary songwriter of the critically-acclaimed Eighties alternative rock band The Call, Michael Been stood out as one of the few American musicians to attract a dedicated following at a time when groups from the British Isles dominated the airwaves. Been's powerful baritone and his passionate belief in the redemptive power of rock shone through on the anthemic singles "The Walls Came Down", "I Still Believe (Great Design)" and "Let The Day Begin", and he was recognised as a kindred spirit by Peter Gabriel, U2's Bono and the Simple Minds frontman Jim Kerr, who guested on The Call's various albums and asked them to open for his band. In 1987, another admirer, the film director Martin Scorsese, cast Been as the Apostle John in his epic The Last Temptation of Christ. "It was one of the greatest times of my life," said the singer. "He felt there was a similarity in what the band was singing about and the purpose of his movies."

Russian President invites Bono to tea at his Black Sea dacha

The rock music-loving Russian President Dmitry Medvedev hosted the U2 frontman, Bono, at his holiday mansion near the Black Sea resort of Sochi yesterday, and praised him for writing music "that unites generations".

Story of the Song: Beautiful Day, U2, 2000

Sessions for one of the defining millennial anthems began in Dublin in the winter of 1999. The producer Brian Eno devised the rhythm on a sequencer and drum machine.

Live Aid Memories: 'It was life-changing: my life was not all about just me anymore'

Midge Ure: Co-wrote the 1984 Band Aid single Do They Know It's Christmas? and helped to organise Live Aid

Sun shines on the true spirit of Glastonbury

Even a dreary set from Gorillaz isn't enough to disappoint festival virgin Hugh Montgomery.

Lou Reed to perform with Gorillaz at Glastonbury

Music legend Lou Reed is preparing to make a guest appearance with Gorillaz as they headline Glastonbury Festival, it was confirmed today.

Glastonbury set for 40th birthday in the sunshine

"Please bring sun protection with you!" announced the Glastonbury organiser Emily Eavis yesterday. It will be music to the ears of the 180,000 who will descend on Worthy Farm over the next few days.

Diary: Konnie's proper Charlie

Congratulations to Konnie Huq and Charlie Brooker on their engagement, which came as even more of a shock to the media than it must have to Brooker, who once callously characterised his own face as "like a rucksack full of dented bells". Another pitiless description that he may care to keep from Konnie is his recent X Factor review. "Silly hair and shit singers: that's The X Factor," he wrote in his Guardian column, "the nation's sole mainstream conduit for popular music since the decline and fall of Top of the Pops. All the songs sound the same, all the singers are alike, and the only interesting acts are mediocre, officially sanctioned hate figures. One day, we'll emerge on the other side of this unprecedented cultural drought and wonder how the hell our imaginations survived." Huq has just been named the new presenter of the X Factor spin-off The Xtra Factor, delaying the pair's honeymoon plans. Blue Peter, I should add, escaped her fiancé's ire.

Diary: Much ado about saying 'I do'

Gemma Arterton got married this weekend, or at least we're pretty sure she did. There are photos in the Mail of Arterton wearing what seems to be a wedding gown, stroking the cheek of a chap in a morning suit, in a romantic Spanish mountain village. Looks a lot like a wedding to me. But her publicist won't confirm whether it is a wedding, or just a rehearsal for St Trinians 3. I contact said publicist to confirm that she won't confirm it. "I am not able to comment on Gemma's private life, or confirm anything," she confirms. "She is very guarded and private about it." Fair enough. But if she's so guarded, why tell the Mail about her fears of spinsterdom, and hurt at hints she'd put on weight? Well, at least one of those quotes is "completely untrue". Shocking stuff, but plausible: in May, according to the paper, Arterton's fiance was stunt driver Stefano Mioni. The bloke in the "wedding" snaps, on the other hand, is Stefano Catelli, sales manager for a fashion company. Probably.

Diary: The sultan of sitting

It seems Bono's not the only crocked rocker. The singer was "devastated" after back surgery forced him to pull out of Glastonbury (and 17 dates of the "U2 360 tour, sponsored by Blackberry"). Now news reaches us that Mark Knopfler, mid-way through a series of solo shows at the Royal Albert Hall, has been performing from the comfort of an ergonomically-enhanced swivel chair. As he explained to his audience on Monday night, the 60-year-old guitar-stroker and former Dire Straits frontman developed a nasty twinge in his lower back a couple of months ago, and acquired the chair while the problem was being diagnosed. Doctors cured the pain and gave him a clean bill of health, but Knopfler decided he likes the chair and plans to stick with it. Rumours from the backstage camp also suggest his band's bassist is suffering from a spot of arthritis. Knopfler, a decade older than Bono, was once known for doing the "Walk of Life". I guess this is the sit of late middle age.

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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

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Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

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