Bono

U2 hit by 'tax dodge' protest at Glastonbury

U2 and Bono, known for their global poverty-fighting efforts, were accused of dodging taxes in Ireland by activists who crashed their performance last night at the Glastonbury festival.

The Timeline: Glastonbury Festival

Farmer Michael Eavis decides to hold a festival to pay off his overdraft. With tickets costing £1 and free milk provided, 1,500 people descend on Worthy Farm near Pilton in Somerset to watch sets from the likes of T Rex (standing in for The Kinks). Eavis is so enamoured with it he decides to continue.

Todd Lynn: Tailor-made rock'n'roll

Designer Todd Lynn has dressed U2 and Marilyn Manson, but he's branching out with a show next week at Ascot. He tells Harriet Walker why he's having a flutter on some new customers

Healing Hans, the celebrities' favourite doctor

Usain Bolt is not the only client of Dr Hans-Wilhelm Müller-Wohlfahrt who happens to be getting back on track after seeking treatment for a spinal problem from the Munich medicine man referred to in sporting circles as "Healing Hans". In May last year, Paul Hewson suffered a temporary paralysis which meant he and his band were obliged to withdraw as the headline act at the Glastonbury Festival.

Holy arena tour: Will Batman be ready for his live stage debut?

"Tonight," says Batman, reading from his cue card, "there will be three homicides in Gotham City. There will be 39 burglaries and 27 robberies. There's an old saying: 'Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.' It's simpler with me: I'm not complicated by friends."

More headlines

Salmaan Taseer: Governor of Punjab and outspoken defender of minority

Speaking up for minorities came easy to Salmaan Taseer, the Governor of Punjab who was brutally assassinated by his own bodyguard last Tuesday. Half a century before he took up the cause of Aasia Noreen, a poor Christian woman facing a death sentence for blasphemy that she never committed, Taseer and his childhood friends resolved to protest the death sentence of Jimmy Wilson, a poor African-American.

Dark nights on Broadway

New York theatre is in crisis – with word of mouth so bad that shows are closing even before opening night.

Diary: Bono and the art of creation

"Creating art that has never been done before is the reason I get out of bed in the morning," diminutive U2 frontman Paul "Bono" Hewson has informed The New York Times, before comparing his latest work with that of Rilke, William Blake, Wim Wenders and Roy Lichtenstein. The project in question? Spider-Man, the musical, which begins previews on Broadway next week after a postponement for extra rehearsals. The man Tony Blair thought would make a better Prime Minister than Gordon Brown – a singer, activist, hotelier, sometime newspaper editor and leading investor in "arguably the worst run institutional fund of any size in the United States" – went on, "If the only wows you get from Spider-Man are visual, special-effect, spectacular-type wows, and not wows from the soul and the heart, we will all think that we've failed." Perhaps anticipating more critical "hmms" than "wows", Paul plans to be in Australia when the curtain rises on the first performance.