Don't junk it ... use it

Save some bread by using your loaf

Letter: A proper lady

Sir: The word "lady" (Letters, 7 April) - for all who care to look it up - means bread-maker.

Words: Hostess

Children taken to parties used to be told to behave and to be sure to say a nice thank you to the hostess, most likely remembered as a stately dame with what the French would call beaucoup de monde au balcon. Later, hostesses presided (always the word) over the afternoon teacakes and scones, and were gracious. Modern hostesses of this sort have little in common with the wide-eyed 17-year-old "Soho hostess" who, according to reports, befriended the Tory MP Piers Merchant, apart from the name they share.

Letter: The joys of a peanut butter sandwich

Sir: Brown or white bread?

Give us yesterday's daily bread: shopping

There's no doubt about it. Retro is the rage. As designers the world over run out of ideas, their "back to the future" policy is ensuring that their nests are feathered for at least another season.

Stores warned on 'fresh' bread

Frozen bread cannot be considered fresh, trading standards officers said. They are to issue new guidelines next month on the way supermarkets must describe their bread baked in-store.

Britons go off wholemeal

THE mighty white is back. In the Eighties more and more people turned to brown and it looked as if soggy white bread might soon be toast. Wholemeal, the nutritionists said, was the best thing since sliced bread, but now the British public has had enough.

The Investment column: Tomkins set to unlock Gates

Tomkins, which embraces everything from bread to petrochemical valves, has stuck doggedly to its conglomerate roots, despite the ending of the City's love affair with the sector. It has been rewarded with a share price which has underperformed the rest of the market for five long years. Although it may be too early to call a change in sentiment, there are straws in the wind which look more hopeful than for some time.

True gripes; electric toasters

I have just chucked out our umpteenth electric toaster. Three months out of guarantee, it's as dead as a doornail and I'm not really surprised. Used to it, in fact, for of all electrical appliances, the toaster is the most predictably unreliable. In an age when men can walk on the moon, surf the Internet and build cars that will survive Nigel Mansell's driving, they still can't make a toaster which will survive making toast.

where shall we meet? Hip Bagel, SW10

Although the five-screen MGM cinema is one of London's more popular non-West End venues, the choice of meeting places in the area is mostly limited to meals or drinks in full, or nasty places full of staring men. But Hip Bagel, despite a name reminiscent of downtown Tel Aviv, is more than just civilised: it's a positive pleasure to go into. The premises are spacious, mirrored and uncrowded (only five tables and a wall-bar), and covered with pictures of the "art for sale" type. Sandwiches are excellent: loads of different breads (black, chaleh, rye) and traditional fillings like chopped liver and herring. A smoked salmon and cream cheese or salt beef bagel is £2.95. Open 8am- 10.30pm daily.

Letter: Millennial ideas for all

TWO ideas for the Millennium Fund (Neal Ascherson, 27 November): spend the money on replanting the great forests. This would benefit us all, and not be limited to one location.

Eviction for bird feeders

Council tenants in north-west London are being threatened with eviction if they feed pigeons on their estate.

Tomkins loses pounds 50m in bread price battle: Correction

Food retailers have lost pounds 50m because of price wars in the bread market, not Tomkins as stated in yesterday's edition.

Bunhill: Running on bread: Correction

FINALLY, apologies: on 17 April, Bunhill wrote that Peter Earl had once been chairman of Filofax. He's never been a director, let alone chairman. Sorry.

ABF in talks on sale of Bakers Oven chain

ASSOCIATED British Foods yesterday confirmed market rumours that it was discussing the sale of its chain of 400 Bakers Oven bread shops to Greggs.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

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After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
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Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
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Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
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China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003
Barbara Woodward: Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with the growing economic superpower

Our woman in Beijing builds a new relationship

Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with growing economic power
Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer. But the only British soldier to be awarded the Victoria Cross in Afghanistan has both

Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer

Beware of imitations, but the words of the soldier awarded the Victoria Cross were the real thing, says DJ Taylor
Alexander McQueen: The catwalk was a stage for the designer's astonishing and troubling vision

Alexander McQueen's astonishing vision

Ahead of a major retrospective, Alexander Fury talks to the collaborators who helped create the late designer's notorious spectacle
New BBC series savours half a century of food in Britain, from Vesta curries to nouvelle cuisine

Dinner through the decades

A new BBC series challenged Brandon Robshaw and his family to eat their way from the 1950s to the 1990s
Philippa Perry interview: The psychotherapist on McDonald's, fancy specs and meeting Grayson Perry on an evening course

Philippa Perry interview

The psychotherapist on McDonald's, fancy specs and meeting Grayson Perry on an evening course
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef recreates the exoticism of the Indonesian stir-fry

Bill Granger's Indonesian stir-fry recipes

Our chef was inspired by the south-east Asian cuisine he encountered as a teenager
Chelsea vs Tottenham: Harry Kane was at Wembley to see Spurs beat the Blues and win the Capital One Cup - now he's their great hope

Harry Kane interview

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The Last Word: For the good of the game: why on earth don’t we leave Fifa?

Michael Calvin's Last Word

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