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Newly released papers reveal a startling lack of unity in Government circles over how to respond to the 1982 Argentine invasion

Tory rebels back Ken Clarke in first challenge to Hague

WILLIAM HAGUE faces the first direct challenge to his authority as Conservative Party leader with the publication of a European election leaflet urging Tory supporters to choose between him and Kenneth Clarke.

Hurdles to Overcome

ONE REASON Tony Blair and almost everyone is anxious to resolve the issues of arms decommissioning and forming a new executive in the course of this week is that Northern Ireland faces a daunting timetable over the next few months.

Heath attacks Hague on EU

WILLIAM HAGUE came under fresh fire from his own side last night as Sir Edward Heath accused him of talking "nonsense" over the EU Commission crisis.

Mowlam says deal is `hair's breadth away'

MO MOWLAM, Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, said yesterday in Washington thatNorthern Ireland was "a hair's breadth away" from a deal that would unblock progress on a new executive for the province.

Letter: No Ordinary murder

Sir: The appalling murder of Rosemary Nelson is intended to wreck the Good Friday agreement and capitalises on the current delay in putting it into action.

Leading Article: Come on, Mr Blair: call a referendum on the euro now

TONY BLAIR said last week that his Government intended to join the single European currency provided that the conditions were right. Fudge and mudge, as David Owen once famously said. "Both intention and conditions are genuine," the Prime Minister declared. But this is simply not true. The intention is genuine, but the conditions are stuff and nonsense. It has been plain since long before he became Prime Minister both that Mr Blair would like Britain to join the euro, and that he began tiptoeing flat out towards that aim the moment he entered Downing Street.

People and Business: Identity change

THE INTERNATIONAL Securities Market Association has lined up its usual list of high profile speakers for its AGM in Stockholm in May, including Chris Patten, former governor of Hong Kong, and Brownyn Curtis, head of economics at Nomura.

What this Government needs is a whole lot more of Tony's cronies

SINCE THE election, one Tory attack on the government has hit home. Utter the two dreaded words "Tony's cronies" and ministers shiver, Tories cheer, and journalists exchange knowing nods. To the left of us, to the right of us and down the middle Tony's mates are meant to be everywhere.

Law: Day of the public is here

Britain's top campaigning lawyer is determined to make a difference

The year in question

Has Christmas Day wiped out all your memories of the past year? Let Christopher Hawtree rekindle them with this fiendish test

Books: Heroes and villains of 1998

After a hyperactive year in books, The Literator is seeing stars - and turkeys

At last, good old anger is back with us

THE SHOCK is almost too much. On Wednesday afternoon, after a long period of the most anodyne politics I can recall in this country, normal service was suddenly resumed. A senior government minister took a decision that outraged the Leader of the Opposition, sent Baroness Thatcher into near-apoplexy and infuriated headline writers in what we used fondly to call "the Tory press". They all raged impotently but there was nothing they could do - short of hiring a helicopter and organising an Entebbe- style raid on Virginia Water, which would surely give pause even to Lady Thatcher - to prevent General Augusto Pinochet, late of the 1st Torturers, Santiago Division, being hauled before Belmarsh magistrates' court on Friday afternoon.

Memo to Mr Blair: Europe could turn you into the new John Major

The early Major days are the most forgotten in recent politics, a heady time with record-breaking poll ratings

Patten may see Stalker Report

THE FORMER Hong Kong Governor Chris Patten indicated last night that he has been given clearance to examine highly sensitive documents concerning the RUC, including the unpublished Stalker Report into the so-called "shoot to kill" incidents in which six people were killed by police in the early 1980s.

Podium: Peace will be found in Ulster

George Mitchell
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A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

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A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
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If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

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Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935
The Silk Roads that trace civilisation: Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places

The Silk Roads that trace civilisation

Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places
House of Lords: Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled

The honours that shame Britain

Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled
When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race

'When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race'

Why are black men living the stereotypes and why are we letting them get away with it?
International Tap Festival: Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic

International Tap Festival comes to the UK

Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic
War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Turkey's buffer zone in Syria: self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Ankara accused of exacerbating racial division by allowing Turkmen minority to cross the border
Doris Lessing: Acclaimed novelist was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show

'A subversive brothel keeper and Communist'

Acclaimed novelist Doris Lessing was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show
Big Blue Live: BBC's Springwatch offshoot swaps back gardens for California's Monterey Bay

BBC heads to the Californian coast

The Big Blue Live crew is preparing for the first of three episodes on Sunday night, filming from boats, planes and an aquarium studio
Austin Bidwell: The Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England with the most daring forgery the world had known

Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England

Conman Austin Bidwell. was a heartless cad who carried out the most daring forgery the world had known
Car hacking scandal: Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked

Car hacking scandal

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