News Former correspondent of the News of the World and Sunday Mirror Dan Evans arrives at the Old Bailey

“Shock” and “anxiety” ran through the editorial floor of the News of the World the day two people were arrested in 2006 in connection with phone hacking. The description, from the former News International staff journalist Dan Evans, was told to the jury at the phone hacking trial.

'Hundreds' of mobiles hacked by newspaper

The row over mobile phone voicemail intercepts by the News of the World is likely to flare up again with a claim today that well over 100 people have had their private accounts hacked.

The <i>IoS</i> Diary

Pure as the driven snow

Minister embroiled in hacking row over voicemail messages

The controversy over the News of the World is re-opened with new claims about the then media minister and Boris Johnson &ndash; and now footballer Sol Campbell is contacting the police

PCC clears Murdoch paper over hacking claim

Press Complaints Commission (PCC) has dismissed allegations that journalists at one of media mogul Rupert Murdoch's newspapers regularly hacked into the phones of public figures to secure sensational stories.

Guardian loses PCC phone-hacking case

The Press Complaints Commission, the watchdog for the newspaper industry, has rejected claims by The Guardian that a widespread and ongoing culture of phone-hacking existed at the News of the World, Britain's biggest-selling Sunday title. After investigation, the PCC reported that it "found no evidence that phone-message hacking is ongoing" at the tabloid, owned by Rupert Murdoch's News International.

The Sketch: Buy jailed Goodman's silence? Nooo...

The story so far (I'd forgotten everything except that there was a story). Major news organisation pays hacker to get into the phones of princes and celebrities. They then publish the rubbish they find in scoops and spreads and exclusives. The hacker goes to jail. So does the News of the World "royal editor". Many investigations later the paper concludes that their convicted royal editor was the only one involved.

Matthew Norman: Comical Desi's sword of truth

These are not words I expected to write without some potent psychotropic substance seeping through an intravenous drip, but Richard Desmond becomes a role model to us all. The fearlessness he showed in donning the Jonathan Aitken Memorial Suit of Armour to fight Tom Bower for his good name - and on the notoriously murderous terrain that is Mr Justice Eady's courtroom - speaks for itself. So does the plain spoken reverence for truth displayed in the witness box. Above all, though, it's the Corinthian sunniness that seems such a useful paradigm for troublesome times. The post-verdict statement posted on his own Express web site echoes one of modern history's most resilient wartime orators. Churchill, perhaps, in 1940. Or possibly Comical Ali in 2003 as the coalition tanks rolled into Baghdad. "His biggest mistake," declared Richard of Mr Bower, "was in thinking I would not go to court to fight to uphold my reputation."

I never condoned phone hacking, says Coulson

The editor of the News of the World said today he had introduced "rigorous" safeguards to prevent a repeat of the phone-hacking scandal that resulted in the resignation of his predecessor.

Stephen Glover: The BBC has conspired with The Guardian to heat up an old story and attack Murdoch

How do stories emerge in the media? Some people believe reporters simply write down what happens. I’d say it was a bit more complicated than that. Take, for example, the recent hysteria over News of the World journalists hacking into the mobile phones of celebrities.

Deborah Orr: Why is it so hard to prove the obvious?

It's a weird old society indeed when the huge stories that are hardest to break are the ones that everybody knows are true anyway. First, it was the bankers.

Public figures 'suing over phone hacking'

High profile figures whose phones were allegedly hacked by the News of the World are considering suing the newspaper, according to lawyers.

Yard rules out inquiry as hacking row simmers on

Recriminations fly after allegations that News of the World phone-hacking targeted thousands of phones; Murdoch's News Group braced for compensation claims but Tories stand by director of communications

He may be implicated, but Coulson is too important to lose

Denis MacShane, the sharp-eyed Labour MP, was one of the few people outside the Conservative Party to spot the embattled spin doctor Andy Coulson yesterday – in an inner courtyard of the House of Commons beneath Big Ben.

Ian Burrell: Lawyers could be the winners in Fleet Street hacks' 'blagging' game

It was in Portcullis House that Rebekah Wade first let the cat out of the bag. "We have paid the police for information in the past," the editor of The Sun brazenly stated to MPs on the Culture, Media and Sport committee.

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