News Former correspondent of the News of the World and Sunday Mirror Dan Evans arrives at the Old Bailey

“Shock” and “anxiety” ran through the editorial floor of the News of the World the day two people were arrested in 2006 in connection with phone hacking. The description, from the former News International staff journalist Dan Evans, was told to the jury at the phone hacking trial.

'Hundreds' of mobiles hacked by newspaper

The row over mobile phone voicemail intercepts by the News of the World is likely to flare up again with a claim today that well over 100 people have had their private accounts hacked.

The <i>IoS</i> Diary

Pure as the driven snow

Minister embroiled in hacking row over voicemail messages

The controversy over the News of the World is re-opened with new claims about the then media minister and Boris Johnson &ndash; and now footballer Sol Campbell is contacting the police

PCC clears Murdoch paper over hacking claim

Press Complaints Commission (PCC) has dismissed allegations that journalists at one of media mogul Rupert Murdoch's newspapers regularly hacked into the phones of public figures to secure sensational stories.

Guardian loses PCC phone-hacking case

The Press Complaints Commission, the watchdog for the newspaper industry, has rejected claims by The Guardian that a widespread and ongoing culture of phone-hacking existed at the News of the World, Britain's biggest-selling Sunday title. After investigation, the PCC reported that it "found no evidence that phone-message hacking is ongoing" at the tabloid, owned by Rupert Murdoch's News International.

The Sketch: Buy jailed Goodman's silence? Nooo...

The story so far (I'd forgotten everything except that there was a story). Major news organisation pays hacker to get into the phones of princes and celebrities. They then publish the rubbish they find in scoops and spreads and exclusives. The hacker goes to jail. So does the News of the World "royal editor". Many investigations later the paper concludes that their convicted royal editor was the only one involved.

Matthew Norman: Comical Desi's sword of truth

These are not words I expected to write without some potent psychotropic substance seeping through an intravenous drip, but Richard Desmond becomes a role model to us all. The fearlessness he showed in donning the Jonathan Aitken Memorial Suit of Armour to fight Tom Bower for his good name - and on the notoriously murderous terrain that is Mr Justice Eady's courtroom - speaks for itself. So does the plain spoken reverence for truth displayed in the witness box. Above all, though, it's the Corinthian sunniness that seems such a useful paradigm for troublesome times. The post-verdict statement posted on his own Express web site echoes one of modern history's most resilient wartime orators. Churchill, perhaps, in 1940. Or possibly Comical Ali in 2003 as the coalition tanks rolled into Baghdad. "His biggest mistake," declared Richard of Mr Bower, "was in thinking I would not go to court to fight to uphold my reputation."

I never condoned phone hacking, says Coulson

The editor of the News of the World said today he had introduced "rigorous" safeguards to prevent a repeat of the phone-hacking scandal that resulted in the resignation of his predecessor.

Stephen Glover: The BBC has conspired with The Guardian to heat up an old story and attack Murdoch

How do stories emerge in the media? Some people believe reporters simply write down what happens. I’d say it was a bit more complicated than that. Take, for example, the recent hysteria over News of the World journalists hacking into the mobile phones of celebrities.

Deborah Orr: Why is it so hard to prove the obvious?

It's a weird old society indeed when the huge stories that are hardest to break are the ones that everybody knows are true anyway. First, it was the bankers.

Public figures 'suing over phone hacking'

High profile figures whose phones were allegedly hacked by the News of the World are considering suing the newspaper, according to lawyers.

Yard rules out inquiry as hacking row simmers on

Recriminations fly after allegations that News of the World phone-hacking targeted thousands of phones; Murdoch's News Group braced for compensation claims but Tories stand by director of communications

He may be implicated, but Coulson is too important to lose

Denis MacShane, the sharp-eyed Labour MP, was one of the few people outside the Conservative Party to spot the embattled spin doctor Andy Coulson yesterday – in an inner courtyard of the House of Commons beneath Big Ben.

Ian Burrell: Lawyers could be the winners in Fleet Street hacks' 'blagging' game

It was in Portcullis House that Rebekah Wade first let the cat out of the bag. "We have paid the police for information in the past," the editor of The Sun brazenly stated to MPs on the Culture, Media and Sport committee.

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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system