News

Edward Snowden, the US intelligence leaker, may soon be filling a ceremonial role in Britain’s academic life. Students at Glasgow University have embarked on a campaign to have him elected as their rector.

Diary: Liam returns to the Oasis

A bittersweet moment of nostalgia for Liam Gallagher and fans of his former band: the ex-Oasis frontman is due to perform, for the first time, at the venue after which he named the act two decades ago.

Equal pay for women executives is 100 years off, claims report

Female executives hoping to be paid as much as their male colleagues face a wait of almost 100 years, according to a damning report which shows that the pay gap between men and women at the top level of business has widened to £10,546.

Watchdog rules out Andy Coulson investigation

The Electoral Commission will not open an investigation into payments made to David Cameron's former spin doctor Andy Coulson by his former employer News International.

Lottery loophole brings riches to US gamblers

Syndicates with a knowledge of maths have found a way of buying their own luck

Fears that commission reforms will lead to advice 'wasteland'

Plans to force flat fees and qualifications on independent financial advisers could end in many quitting the industry, leaving consumers stranded

Fisheries policy reforms unveiled

The European Commission has promised fishermen a return to "a decent living" under plans to crack down on the plundering of the seas.

Take child payments direct from fathers' accounts, say MPs

New body meant to beef up maintenance system spends 50p to collect each £1 as £4bn goes unpaid

Letters: Gove’s attack on the future of education

So now Michael Gove is concerned that teachers are not respected any more. This comes from a man whose party has followed in the footsteps of their New Labour ideological soulmates by continuing to exploit underpaid classroom assistants as teachers-on-the-cheap. Now they've gone a step further and are asking parents to do the teachers' work for them when the teachers take industrial action on Thursday. And he wonders why there is no respect. Does he really?

EU maternity leave plans rejected

The Government has welcomed moves to shelve EU maternity leave plans which would have cost the Treasury an extra £2.5 billion a year.

Australian McKinnon to join Hull

Hull have clinched the signing of the Australian full-back Wade McKinnon from Wests Tigers. The 30-year-old former New Zealand Warriors, Parramatta and South Sydney player will arrive next season on a three-year contract, having been released from the final year of his deal with his present club.

Editor-At-Large: The giving sector is a mess – and that's being charitable

David Cameron wants us to give more to charity – an admirable goal most of us would endorse. Last week he talked of "nudging" the public into giving more by pressing a donation key at cash machines, or by "rounding up" the total when we pay a bill. Critics say that Dave's Big Society is doomed, but I'm not so cynical.

Pay of Britain's top earners 'set to spiral'

The pay of the country's top earners is set to "spiral" to levels not seen for decades, with the public having no confidence that the Government or business can do anything to tackle excessive pay, a report said today.

Exclusive: Salaries for top executives are rocketing 'out of control'

A new investigation shows pay inequality is accelerating in Britain, with top bosses set to earn 215 times the average wage by 2020. It also demolishes the arguments they put forward to support their astonishing incomes

Appeal court orders search of Galloway's charity papers

Civil servants have been ordered to reconsider disclosing thousands of documents relating to a fund run by former MP George Galloway during Saddam Hussein's regime.

David Prosser: Lessons for Britain from the Galleon insider trading scandal

Outlook It took the jury three weeks, but in the end, the Feds got their man. And in securing a guilty verdict on each count levelled against the hedge fund boss Raj Rajaratnam, the US District Attorney Preet Bharara has sent a powerful message to Wall Street. Despite their protests that the line has become blurred, financiers should be perfectly capable of distinguishing between investment research (legal) and privileged information (illegal). Those who cross the line should expect to find investigators emboldened by this verdict.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project