News

Ten new names added as HMRC renews appeal on 19 suspects wanted for variety of tax offences

Father describes seeing two sons shot in head

A father spoke today of his horror at seeing his two sons shot in the head in front of him.

Shell to sell Woodside stake

Shell has put a significant portion of its 34 per cent stake in Woodside Petroleum up for sale for $3.3bn (£2bn), fuelling speculation that Australia's largest oil and gas firm could become a bid target.

Cabbie may have attacked over 100 women

Cabbie John Worboys is believed to be the UK's most prolific sex offender after it emerged today he may have attacked at least 102 women.

Rays of light in Croydon's black cloud

Money-laundering, suicide and an owner implicated in spot-fixing. But the fans can ensure the Rams survive.

Councils 'treating staff like dirt'

A growing number of councils were treating their workforce like "dirt" by issuing statutory notices warning of redundancies as part of spending cuts, union leaders claimed today

Football club chairman found dead

The chairman of a football club caught up in the Pakistan match-fixing scandal is thought to have taken his own life, it emerged today.

Brough and ready Giants take huge step towards final

Warrington Wolves 22, Huddersfield Giants 34

Outside The Box: Everton get with programme and transfer rare gem to United

A friendly gesture from Everton, who have allowed the Manchester United museum to borrow what is claimed to be the oldest known United programme. It is for a game in April 1889 between Everton and Newton Heath, forerunners of United, who went bankrupt some 13 years later.

The Kid (15)

Two different movies seem to have been bolted together here, one a memoir of a horribly abusive childhood in council-estate Croydon, the other an everyday story of rise and fall amid the opportunist frenzy of the 1980s.

Outside the Box: Fab five now Euro members but moneybags City miss cut

Never mind the so-called and surely outmoded "Big Four" of English football. According to the European Clubs Association, the umbrella organisation that succeeded and expanded more than tenfold the G14 group, England now has a Big Five and a Not-Quite-As-Big Five.

Outside the Box: Croydon Athletic's rise has been as rapid as a Pakistan no-ball

So, who are Croydon Athletic, propelled on to the news pages last week by the revelation that their owner is Mazhar Majeed, the friend and alleged fixer to the Pakistan cricket team? Theirs is a classic story of a small club rising through the ranks with great speed and attracting much controversy along the way. Barely two decades ago there was Wandsworth & Norwood FC, amalgamated from a club that played on Wandsworth Common and another from the Herne Hill cycle track. The name was changed to Croydon Athletic, "The Rams", in 1990 and they would have moved through the leagues even faster but for their ground needing improvements along the way. Majeed, born in Croydon, became co-owner in 2008, stating that his ambition was to reach the Conference, one tier below the Football League. Operating on what appeared to be a far greater budget than most, Athletic comfortably won the Ryman League First Division South last season to reach the Premier Division. Majeed boasted to the News of the World 's undercover reporters about using the club to launder money from his gambling winnings. The former chairman Dean Fisher has been sent to prison for three months for defrauding his employers of more than £525,000, some of which, he claimed in court, went to the club. Meanwhile the team have made a confident start at the higher level, with two away wins and a home draw. The club, and the Ryman League, have promised to co-operate fully with investigations being made by the police and the Football Association.

The Blitz: Survivors' stories

Jammed on Underground platforms, putting out fires, digging families out of air-raid shelters, waking to find an unexploded bomb in the garden, getting separated from siblings: ten recount their experiences

Croydon – from concrete hell to cutting edge?

A new arts and entertainment initiative aims to do for the unlovely borough what the Guggenheim did for Bilbao

Rushed off my feet, shirking nine to five

Sophie Heawood can scarcely find the time to procrastinate

Helen Croydon: Monogamy is not our natural state

Choosing our family members, wasn't, you would have thought, a matter for the high courts, not in a democratised world anyway. But it seems judicial teams in the most unlikely of places are taking on these new roles, attempting to define our marital nirvana. Last week, a Californian judge ruled that the state's ban on gay marriages was unconstitutional, leaving thousands of people free at last to choose who they marry.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine