Property

When the British fashion design duo Antoni & Alison bought a derelict 1820s house, they spent a year, they say, "Going, 'Agh! What do we do with it?'" They wanted to respect its history but not to the point that it resembled an English Heritage property. The result is a surprisingly beautiful blend of giant Mr Blobby ornaments and painstakingly salvaged authenticity (above). On 17 September, as part of London Fashion Week, they open it to the public (open houselondon. org.uk). I asked Antoni what he'd learnt during the restoration...

Lost: Taxpayers' art treasures

Government admits mislaying 67 paintings acquired for the nation.

Could the UK Government shut down the web?

A huge cyber attack or mass civil unrest would give Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt powers to shut down the web. But how is it even possible? Nick Harding finds out

Inspectors condemn West Midlands police cells

Virtually every police cell in Britain's second largest force failed safety tests, inspectors said today.

Cameron tries to get Big Society adverts on TV – for nothing

For all those struggling to cope with those listless minutes between the end of Emmerdale and the start of Coronation Street, help may soon be at hand – the Big Society is coming to the small screen. The Government is in negotiations with commercial terrestrial television broadcasters over plans to provide a daily "Community Minute" of editorial airtime.

Writers' cemetery protected

The final resting place of some of the greatest names in English literature has been given Grade I status. Daniel Defoe, who wrote Robinson Crusoe, and John Bunyan, author of Pilgrim's Progress, are among those buried at Bunhill Fields Cemetery in central London.

Patten poised for BBC Trust role

Former Conservative chairman Lord Patten looks set to be confirmed as the new head of the BBC's governing body.

Vince Cable's Murdoch gaffe cost £300,000

Vince Cable's gaffe about having "declared war" on media tycoon Rupert Murdoch over his bid to take over BSkyB has cost taxpayers £300,000, it was revealed today.

Leyton Orient lodge appeal over Olympic Stadium

Leyton Orient chairman Barry Hearn has written to Prime Minister David Cameron and London Mayor Boris Johnson asking them to look again at the decision to award West Ham the Olympic Stadium and is taking legal advice over the possibility of a judicial review.

Unions protest against culture cuts

Civil servants will stage a "love-in" today as part of a campaign to save cultural assets from the Government's cuts in public spending.

Raids on British history prompt calls for special 'heritage police'

As national treasures are targeted for profit or kicks, custodians fight back

The sporting week ahead (06/02/11)

Today

Consuming Issues: Ratings should show the good places to stay

Should we be lamenting the potential disappearance of hotel star ratings? The UK's star grading been put under notice by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, which funds the system. John Penrose, the Tourism minister, said: "The official ratings systems are too often unreliable and unfair not only for the industry but for the consumer."

RFL warns MPs over cuts fears

The chairman of the Rugby League fears that the game could face a funding shortfall for the 2013 World Cup because of the abolition of regional agencies under the Government's cuts.

Sky takeover bid decision delayed by Hunt

Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt kept the door ajar for News Corporation's planned takeover of BSkyB today when he delayed a decision on whether to refer the deal for a full-blown competition inquiry.

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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
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Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

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Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

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Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
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Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
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Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

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Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
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Marginal Streets project documents voters

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How to survive a Twitter mauling

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Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
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The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

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Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence