Property

When the British fashion design duo Antoni & Alison bought a derelict 1820s house, they spent a year, they say, "Going, 'Agh! What do we do with it?'" They wanted to respect its history but not to the point that it resembled an English Heritage property. The result is a surprisingly beautiful blend of giant Mr Blobby ornaments and painstakingly salvaged authenticity (above). On 17 September, as part of London Fashion Week, they open it to the public (open houselondon. org.uk). I asked Antoni what he'd learnt during the restoration...

Corinne Bennett: Architect who made the conservation of cathedrals her speciality

In 1974 Corinne Bennett became the first woman to hold the post of architect to one of the country's cathedrals. She was appointed by that sagacious Dean, Michael Stancliffe, to Winchester, one of the most ancient and breathtakingly beautiful of all our cathedrals. She came to the position through an apprenticeship in the understanding of ancient buildings that was already discernible at her Convent School in Hove, where she was a pupil after her family came to England from Canada when she was nine. How surprised she would have been to know that she would become consultant architect to Brighton Pavilion, and to the Albert Memorial, two of the most bizarre buildings in England. The range of architectural responsibilities placed on her shoulders was breathtaking.

D-Day for Spurs' £400m stadium plans

Tottenham will discover on 30 September whether their £400m plans to redevelop White Hart Lane have the green light.

The Gleek's guide to keeping fit

Who needs aerobics when you can tone your body with high-energy dance routines from 'Glee'? Holly Williams plasters on a stage smile and gets on down

Saatchi rues lost art of conversation as gallery donation talks collapse

Charles Saatchi's pledge to donate his gallery and modern art collection to the public is in jeopardy after talks with the Arts Council broke down.

Paul Newman: Clubs on the move swap character for revenue streams

The FootbalL League column: For people to watch football, modern stadiums are far superior

Artists flinch at 'honour' of hanging in Tory offices

Culture minister Ed Vaizey says he ruffled feathers after selecting contemporary artworks to adorn Westminster

Cutting edge: radical arts funding

Britain's creative output is hugely imaginative. But when it comes to funding, the arts world is one of the most conservative industries in the country. David Lister, arts editor, argues that reducing budgets could radicalise culture

Hendrix in Britain <em>and</em> Handel's house

By all accounts iconic ‘70s rock star Jimi Hendrix and eighteenth century classical composer George Frideric Handel, are pretty dissimilar. But there is a surprising connection between the musical pair: they lived at the same address in Mayfair, London, albeit 209 years apart.

Peace, on earth: Find tranquility in English Heritage's beautiful gardens

The National Trust may well own England's most famous gardens, but English Heritage's are the most peaceful, by a mile. The first English Heritage landscape I ever went to see was at Wrest Park, halfway between the M1 and the A1 in Bedfordshire. The landscape at Wrest Park is dotted with delicate buildings, beautiful old trees, long canals and vistas; a sort of smaller version of Stowe for those who don't want to walk until their legs drop off. But particularly appealing is the fact that on a day when Stowe would be heaving with people picnicking, Wrest feels almost as if you have the place to yourself.

Simon Calder: Best to file the tourism deficit under 'lost cause'

Captain Cameron's mandarins in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport have their work cut out in persuading British travellers to holiday at home. Despite the ever-more stressful and strike-prone experience of travel by air, we have an apparently insatiable desire to leave our sceptre'd isle.

David Cameron: Cuts will net 'prize' of stronger economy

Prime Minister David Cameron today insisted there was "light at the end of the tunnel" if his Government pushed through drastic spending cuts, with the prospect of a stronger economy as a result.

Arts Quangos: A threat to our cultural life

If you abolished all quangos, the arts in Britain would pretty much cease to exist in their current form. Because governments since 1945 have conformed to the "arms length principle" by which it is deemed improper for ministers to take direct control of culture, much of the funding and basic administration of the arts has been carried out by unelected quangos.

Philip Hensher: Sorry need not be the hardest word

To apologise is to divide yourself, momentarily, in two. There is the person who has offended; and there is the person with a moral attitude, who recognises the wrong of the statement or act committed. It is not an easy act to perform, and has to be taught. Small children have to be trained to understand not just that hitting their smaller sibling was wrong, but that it is important to acknowledge that wrongness, and to state it. A person who never learns to divide themselves in this way has some fundamental incapacity.

Jeremy Hunt: Faster, higher, stronger &ndash; and cheaper

The new Culture Secretary has a difficult juggling act as he tries to keep the Olympics on budget while looking for huge cuts elsewhere. Matt Chorley meets Jeremy Hunt

What are we getting out of the Olympic Games?

Culture Secretary doubts if 2012 can provide legacy of encouraging Britons to take up sport &ndash; and blames Labour.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?