Arts and Entertainment In rehearsal: the Don is sung in Kasper Holten's new production by the Polish baritone Mariusz Kwiecien

As the Royal Opera opens its new Don Giovanni, Jessica Duchen argues that its theme of moral vacuity is as relevant now as in Mozart's day

BBC Symphony Orchestra, Barbican Hall, London<br/>Markus Werba, Wigmore Hall, London<br/>London Philharmonic Orchestra, Royal Festival Hall, London

As the BBC Symphony Orchestra turns 80, its value for money has never been more pronounced

Album: Mozart, Symphony No 40 / Idomeneo (Avie)

Based in Cleveland, Ohio, the period-instruments orchestra Apollo's Fire was founded in 1992.

Album: Rene Jacobs, Mozart: The Magic Flute (Harmonia Mundi)

René Jacobs ongoing coverage of the entire Mozart opera oeuvre continues with The Magic Flute, performed as usual with the RIAS Kammerchor and Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin.

Katie Derham: 'I feel I have got a part of myself back'

A career in television led to Katie Derham neglecting her childhood passion for the violin. Rediscovering it changed her life and even saw her playing to a live audience

Tony Hall: Taking high culture to the mass market

The Business Interview: He has to broaden the Royal Opera House's audience while also facing down spending cuts. Sarah Arnott meets him

Album: Fabio di C&#192;sola, Mozart: Clarinet Concerto (Sony Classical)

Written late in his short life, the Clarinet Concerto in A major was Mozart's last purely instrumental piece, and one of his most beautiful, a work whose delicate melodic charm is matched by the rigorous restraint of the clarinet part, in which excessive ornamentation is eschewed in favour of a nimble, lyrical grace.

Anthony Rolfe Johnson: British tenor who excelled in the works of Britten, Mozart and Monteverdi

The British tenor Anthony Rolfe Johnson was one of the finest exponents in his generation of the roles originally sung by Peter Pears in the operas of Benjamin Britten. However, his interpretations were in no way copies of the senior tenor's idiosyncratic versions; rather, they were recreations of the music that perfectly suited his own voice and style. His other favourite opera composers were Monteverdi and Mozart, while he sang the great Bach Passions and Handel oratorios throughout his career. As a recitalist he was a founder member of the Songmakers' Almanac and specialised in Schubert lieder and Britten's canticles. He also became an excellent conductor, especially of operas in which he had himself sung, such as Monteverdi's L'Orfeo.

Album: Danielle De Niese, Diva (Decca)

The popular young soprano's third album is a bit of a cheat, being largely comprised of arias plucked from her two previous albums dedicated to Handel and Mozart, including the splendid duet from Don Giovanni with Bryn Terfel, "Là Ci Darem La Mano".

Cesare Siepi: Opera singer celebrated for his portrayal of Mozart&rsquo;s Don Giovanni

The Italian bass Cesare Siepi was one of the finest exponents of Mozart's Don Giovanni to tread the opera stage in the second half of the 20th century. He sang the role 71 times in New York at the Metropolitan Opera; he sang it at La Scala in Milan, the Vienna State Opera, the Salzburg Festival, the Royal Opera House in London and many other places. He was also a powerful King Philip II in Don Carlos and sang at least eight or nine other of Verdi's rewarding bass roles. His range easily extended to Wagner, sung in Italian at La Scala and in German at the Met. His beautiful voice, strong, warm and supple, allied to good looks and a splendid stage presence, brought him a popularity that lasted throughout his long career.

Don Giovanni, Glyndebourne, East Sussex<br/>I was looking at the ceiling and then I saw the sky, Theatre Royal Stratford East, London

The hottest sparks fly in the pit as Jurowski tackles Mozart's trickiest masterpiece for the first time

Don Giovanni, Holland Park, London<br/>Idomeneo, Coliseum, London<br/>Zaide, Sadler's Wells, London<br/>Simon Boccanegra, Royal Opera House, London

Stephen Barlow brings out the comedy in Mozart's lustiest opera, but Ian Page's melodrama-by-committee is just dire

Golden ticket: British theatre's dynamic duo bring Don Giovanni to Glyndebourne

Can Jonathan Kent and Paul Brown make 'Don Giovanni' as relevant today as it was when Mozart wrote it 223 years ago? Those lucky enough to hold Glyndebourne's golden ticket are in for a big surprise

Mozart Don Giovanni, Opera Holland Park

There’s narcissism and there’s narcissism and in his terrific new staging of Mozart’s Don Giovanni for Opera Holland Park director Stephen Barlow leaves us in no doubt as to who’s the fairest of them all.

Mozart Zaide, Classical Opera Company, Sadler&rsquo;s Wells

The bare bones of Mozart’s unfinished opera Zaide comprise one glorious aria for the enslaved heroine – the aspirational “Ruhe sanft” – and an assortment of other numbers which might be considered mediocre by Mozart’s standards but which would more than cut the mustard by anybody else’s.

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