Sport

Since his blistering run of 9.91sec in the 100 metres semi-final at the UK Trials, James Dasaolu has become something of an invisible man in sprinting terms. After becoming only the fourth Briton to dip under that dream 10sec barrier, the hope – in fact, expectation – was that Dasaolu would back that up... and soon.

Meadows savours silver lining

2800m runner loses out but sets new British record / Ennis raises gold bar and Chambers sprints to glory

Chambers refuses to indulge in drugs talk

After easing through 60m heats, Briton avoids comment on sprint duo who failed tests

Ennis turns frontrunner for Britain's indoor goal

'There's a target on my back now' admits world champion as team seek lift for 2012

Dwain Chambers: 'I realise what I almost lost – that kills me'

The British sprinter has finally made a clean break from his drug-tainted past and, fit and firing, he heads to the World Indoors relishing being back in the fold and going for gold. He talks to Simon Turnbull

British hopes of world gold hit by Idowu's paternity leave

And then there were three. When the Great Britain team depart for Doha today, ahead of the World Indoor Championships, which open in the Qatari capital on Friday, one of their major hopes for gold will be left at home holding the baby. Phillips Idowu made the late decision yesterday to take paternity leave instead of defending the triple jump title he won in Valencia two years ago. Which leaves British hopes for global indoor gold pinned on the shoulders of Jessica Ennis, Jenny Meadows and Dwain Chambers.

Idowu to defend indoor crown in Doha

There was a time when Phillips Idowu was like Forrest Gump's box of chocolates: you never knew what you were going to get when he set off down the triple jump runway. Now, having gained a level of consistency that has taken him to the top of the hop, step and jump game with World Championship titles indoors and out, the big Belgrave Harrier is becoming something like Churchill's vision of Russia: a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma. Twice last week Idowu declined to say whether he would be defending his world indoor crown in Doha next week. "If you see me in the world indoors, you'll see me in the world indoors," he said.

Chambers cuts a dash to Doha with year best

It is approaching eight years now since Dwain Chambers and Mark Lewis-Francis settled into their starting blocks for the great Saturday night sprint showdown at the Mancunian Commonwealth Games. The young speed merchants appeared to have the world at their feet: Chambers, at 24 already a World Championship bronze medallist and Lewis-Francis, the 19-year-old Billy Whizz Kid from West Bromwich who was threatening to break through the 10 seconds barrier for the 100m. So what happened next? The gun fired and the world started to crumble for the Great British likely lads.

2020 vision: Giggsy-wiggsy, football coming home, Arsène's pre-teen wonders... weren't they, wasn't it, hmmmm?

The decade got off to a miserable start. Remember the jubilation when England got an "easy" draw for the 2010 World Cup? That soon ended. England's campaign in South Africa got off to a nightmarish start when David Beckham, plainly disoriented by altitude sickness, came on with five minutes left against the USA and dispatched a free-kick into his own net. Then the squad had to head home early after the WAGs were imprisoned in Zimbabwe while on an ill-advised shopping trip to Bulawayo, having been arrested for disturbing the peace when they found nothing to buy in the shops. Only slightly more successful (more of which later) was England's hosting of the 2018 World Cup thanks to the last-minute intervention of Dame Susan Boyle.

2020 vision: Our team of futurologists peers into mists of time

Britain's first black prime minister is settling into Number 10, Sir Alexander McQueen has given King Charles a makeover and the City's carbon traders are coining it. Welcome to the future – but what other surprises are around the corner? Our experts reflect on the biggest events of the next 10 years

Drug supplier to sport's big cheats is back in business and 'clean'

If America had a Hall of Fame for sporting disgrace, Victor Conte would occupy its most prominent berth. For almost a decade, the San Francisco-based nutritionist supplied performance-enhancing drugs to some of the world's most notorious cheats, from the steroid-enhanced baseball slugger Barry Bonds to the Olympic athlete Marion Jones and the British sprinter Dwain Chambers.

Injuries send Team GB limping to Berlin

Head coach rails at 'fragile' Britons as squad for world championships is announced

Heptathlete Ennis aims to banish Beijing blues

The spotlight will fall on Britain's one and only Olympic track and field champion, Christine Ohuruogu, and on its lingering cause célèbre, Dwain Chambers, when the Aviva World Trials and UK Championships get under way in Birmingham this evening.

The man to make us say 'Dwain who?'

Simeon Williamson has the raw speed to challenge in the 100m in 2012 and lift British sprinting out of Chambers' tainted shadow. His quest starts this weekend in Birmingham, writes Simon Turnbull

Greene is keen to get Britain off to a flying start

It is fair to say that the most rapidly rising star of British athletics has yet to truly make a name for himself. Nobody was quite sure what to call the man who was selected in the British squad yesterday for the 400m hurdles in the inaugural European Team Championships at Leiria in Portugal. Was it David, Dave or Dai Greene? "David's my name, but Dai's kind of my nickname in Wales," he said.

Danvers sparkle distracts crowd from missing stars

Pilot Super8 event proves a hit despite sponsorship row causing late withdrawals
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America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

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Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

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The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
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Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

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BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
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