Money

Regular readers will recall my articles about overseas pensioners and the anger felt by around half a million of them who have had their state pensions frozen.

Joe Egan: The last surviving member of rugby league’s ‘Indomitables’

The death of Joe Egan at the age of 93 has severed the last surviving link with the most famous of all rugby league tours. In 1946, with the world still in the early stages of recovering from the War, the game's authorities on both sides of the globe were eager for a British Lions tour to Australia and New Zealand to take place as part of a return to normality.

Editorial: Aid to India still has its place

This week, charities working with the poor in three of the most deprived states of India, mainly on elementary education and health projects, will be discussing how best to close down their operations in record time. This follows Justine Greening's decision, announced last Friday, to cut off all financial aid to India by an earlier-than-expected deadline of 2015.

With standing water across the country cholera cases are rising

Haiti fears cholera and food shortages will raise storm's death toll

The government of Haiti has warned that Hurricane Sandy represents a "disaster of major proportions," which could bring food shortages as well as an imminent spike in the number of life-threatening cholera cases.

What does being a moderate mean? Answer: David Brooks

For over a decade, David Brooks of the New York Times has been probably the most influential columnist in America. Influence is impossible to measure, of course, but one reason he has thrived is that politicians of all sides take his calls, thinking he will judge them according to their merit, and not because of ideological predisposition. That is a central tenet of what it is to be a moderate, and he devotes his column today to a lengthy exploration of that word.

Recession caused depression spike – and NHS 'was not prepared'

Recession is being followed by depression, according to researchers who say the number of patients seeking treatment for the illness has leapt by up to half in the past three years.

Cameron watched Boris Johnson's speech earlier today

Cameron aims to end lurch right and show off compassionate side

David Cameron will insist today that he has not abandoned "compassionate Conservatism" as he argues that spending cuts and welfare reform will be good in the long run for the poor, weak and vulnerable.

Berlusconi says he will not stand in spring election

Silvio Berlusconi, the former premier, said yesterday that he may not stand in elections next spring, and suggested that Mario Monti, the technocrat Prime Minister, could stay on as head of a centre-right government.

Ed Miliband reiterates 'One Nation' vision

Ed Miliband has set out his vision of “One Nation Labour” as a way to create a country “where everyone can play their part”.

DVD: Truth or Dare (15)

"Be nice," Gemma informs the rather loathsome Eleanor before a deeply unpleasant game of teenage truth or dare, which ends with sensitive Felix being walloped in the face by a bully (Jack Gordon, convincing).

Darling accuses Osborne of giving up on restoring UK growth

Alistair Darling has accused his successor George Osborne of giving up on restoring growth to the economy.

Power back after blackout in India

Factories and workshops were running again yesterday after electrical grid collapses caused the world's two worst power blackouts.

London 2012: Get ready for the greatest show on Earth, says David Cameron

Britain is ready to welcome “the greatest show on earth”, David Cameron said today.

Minister hints at earlier exit from Afghanistan

The withdrawal of British forces from Afghanistan, due by the end of 2014, could be accelerated if the US judged it was safe, the Defence Secretary, Philip Hammond, said.

Robert Mugabe 'ready to stand down' as Zimbabwe president

The Prime Minister, Morgan Tsvangirai, has said that the long-time President, Robert Mugabe, is ready to give up power if he loses the next election.

Leading article: The key to happiness is blindingly obvious – get a job outdoors

When David Cameron first announced a National Well-Being Survey, critics said its premise was "woolly and impractical".

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?