Arts and Entertainment

With stand-up dominated by the one-comic-and-a mic-form of observational humour, it's little wonder that some comedians are seeking more alternative modes of expression to set themselves apart. The Boy with Tape On His Face distinguishes himself with a joyously retro presentation of silent, performance-led humour, while the bestowal of the Edinburgh Comedy Award on Phil Burgers last year, for his mute, sexualised and playfully scary bouffon Dr Brown, echoed and endorsed the stand-up circuit's burgeoning interest in clowning.

Leisure: TV saga fuels surge in tourism

The television blockbuster Pride and Prejudice is still helping draw the crowds to historic houses, it was disclosed today.

Before and after

In her thirties, a woman is meant to turn into an elegant, confident dresser who doesn't buy mistakes. But how?

Get down and party with Mr Darcy

down to Darcy's wet shirt, says Liz Hunt

Divine end to Grant trauma

Los Angeles - It was a Hollywood ending to a Hollywood scandal: everyone lived happily ever after.

British stars fail to top Hollywood bill

British film stars have lost their clout in Hollywood. Not one figures in this year's annual ranking of Hollywood's 25 most powerful actors and actresses, while only one English director makes the film-maker's list.

Emma Thompson adds Bafta to Oscar trophies

Sense and Sensibility was voted best film of the year at the 1995 Bafta Awards ceremony at the Theatre Royal in London's West End, last night. But unlike the Oscars, Emma Thompson failed to take the prize for best adapted screenplay.

Travel: On the trail of ... the Oscars

The traveller on the Oscars' trail could begin at Waterloo by taking a newly privatised Stagecoach train to Winchester Cathedral and the tomb of Jane Austen. Here, best screenplayer Emma Thompson paid her respects (but not her royalties) to the writer of Sense and Sensibility; pounds 15.20 day return.

Space-cakes in Austenland

Elinor and Marianne by Emma Tennant; Simon & Schuster, pounds 9.99; Byronic communes, fevers on the brain: Victoria Coren just about swallows a salacious sequel to `Sense and Sensibility'

Just the place for a period drama

ONCE, the National Trust hated the idea of camera crews, actors and directors trampling all over its stately homes. Nearly always it turned down film-makers' requests to use its properties.

Not like it was in Mrs Danvers' day

They cook, they clean, they wait at table. And their reward is often abuse. Vicky Ward on housekeepers

LETTER : Quintessential 20th-century artist

From Mr Michael Holroyd

Underrated: Queen of the stock-in-trade

Ah, the British jobbing actress: what a glorious creature] She may never attain the highest rungs of stardom (though there is Emma Thompson and there was Julie Andrews) or be sold as a sex symbol (though there is Greta Scacchi and there was Julie Christie) but she embodies virtues beyond the price of rubies. She is able to turn her hand to all things: light comedy, heavy drama, musicals, sketches, a multitude of accents. She has no contempt for the popular; the popular (a nice little sitcom, a soap opera) pays the rent and subsidises those ill-paid forays into the theatre, to essay Pinter, Shakespeare and Ibsen. She has a sense of humour about herself too. She must. Her parts are, more often than not, attendant on the leading man and even these will shrink after 30, a disgraceful waste of a precious national resource: just as experience is making her better and better, her opportunities become fewer and fewer. She has her pride, but she values common sense. Asked to narrate a children's series, adorn a panel game or appear in an ad and she will smile and crisply answer, 'Yes'.

Bafta nominations

Steven Spielberg's film Schindler's List has been nominated for 13 Bafta movie awards. Remains Of The Day, In the Name Of the Father, Shadowlands and The Piano are also nominated.

THE BIG PICTURE / Seeking the self inside: Not guilty - Adam Mars-Jones reviews In the Name of the Father, the Gerry Conlon story

In the Name of the Father (15) is a film that invites a certain amount of smugness from its audience. If it had been made 10 years ago, before the overturning of the verdicts on the Guildford Four, it would have been a campaigning film, urgent and angry - but of course it couldn't have been made then, couldn't have been lustrously cast or adequately financed.

Hollywood plaudits for 'Guildford Four' movie

THE film In the Name Of the Father, which has been attacked by British right-wing media for glorifying the IRA, was yesterday given a warm endorsement by Hollywood, which nominated it for no fewer than seven Oscars.
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