News

The private investigator regularly commissioned by senior editors at the News of the World was "generally known" by staff to be part of the paper's "special investigations team", the Old Bailey has heard.

The anatomy of a scandal that refuses to go away

Q. What is the source of the original phone hacking claims?

Screws tighten on 'News of the World' in damning MPs' report

The tabloid, the police and the PCC will be slammed on Wednesday, says Matthew Bell

'Hundreds' of mobiles hacked by newspaper

The row over mobile phone voicemail intercepts by the News of the World is likely to flare up again with a claim today that well over 100 people have had their private accounts hacked.

The <i>IoS</i> Diary (31/01/10)

Up with the lark, out with the owls

Minister embroiled in hacking row over voicemail messages

The controversy over the News of the World is re-opened with new claims about the then media minister and Boris Johnson &ndash; and now footballer Sol Campbell is contacting the police

The Tory peer who wants to convince us the PCC has teeth

Lady Buscombe tells Matthew Bell that the Press Complaints Commission is in the clear

Guardian loses PCC phone-hacking case

The Press Complaints Commission, the watchdog for the newspaper industry, has rejected claims by The Guardian that a widespread and ongoing culture of phone-hacking existed at the News of the World, Britain's biggest-selling Sunday title. After investigation, the PCC reported that it "found no evidence that phone-message hacking is ongoing" at the tabloid, owned by Rupert Murdoch's News International.

Donald Trelford: MPs should be discussing more serious issues than this warming of cold potatoes

As I get older, quite a lot that MPs say and do makes me cross, but I have rarely been so grumpy as I was last week, watching the Select Committee for Culture, Media and Sport resuming its farcical inquiry into phone-hacking and other alleged irregularities at the News of the World.

Matthew Norman: Comical Desi's sword of truth

These are not words I expected to write without some potent psychotropic substance seeping through an intravenous drip, but Richard Desmond becomes a role model to us all. The fearlessness he showed in donning the Jonathan Aitken Memorial Suit of Armour to fight Tom Bower for his good name - and on the notoriously murderous terrain that is Mr Justice Eady's courtroom - speaks for itself. So does the plain spoken reverence for truth displayed in the witness box. Above all, though, it's the Corinthian sunniness that seems such a useful paradigm for troublesome times. The post-verdict statement posted on his own Express web site echoes one of modern history's most resilient wartime orators. Churchill, perhaps, in 1940. Or possibly Comical Ali in 2003 as the coalition tanks rolled into Baghdad. "His biggest mistake," declared Richard of Mr Bower, "was in thinking I would not go to court to fight to uphold my reputation."

I never condoned phone hacking, says Coulson

The editor of the News of the World said today he had introduced "rigorous" safeguards to prevent a repeat of the phone-hacking scandal that resulted in the resignation of his predecessor.

'NoW' hacker had beans to spill and a crust to earn

Peter Burden defends Glenn Mulcaire, the recluse at the centre of a media spat

Pressure grows on Tory communications chief

Andy Coulson is to appear before a select committee this week over his former newspaper's involvement in the phone-tapping scandal

Stephen Glover: The BBC has conspired with The Guardian to heat up an old story and attack Murdoch

How do stories emerge in the media? Some people believe reporters simply write down what happens. I’d say it was a bit more complicated than that. Take, for example, the recent hysteria over News of the World journalists hacking into the mobile phones of celebrities.

Phone hacking allegations are irresponsible, says Wade

News International says accusations are untrue and misleading the public

Deborah Orr: Why is it so hard to prove the obvious?

It's a weird old society indeed when the huge stories that are hardest to break are the ones that everybody knows are true anyway. First, it was the bankers.

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War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

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Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
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Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
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Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003
Barbara Woodward: Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with the growing economic superpower

Our woman in Beijing builds a new relationship

Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with growing economic power
Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer. But the only British soldier to be awarded the Victoria Cross in Afghanistan has both

Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer

Beware of imitations, but the words of the soldier awarded the Victoria Cross were the real thing, says DJ Taylor
Alexander McQueen: The catwalk was a stage for the designer's astonishing and troubling vision

Alexander McQueen's astonishing vision

Ahead of a major retrospective, Alexander Fury talks to the collaborators who helped create the late designer's notorious spectacle
New BBC series savours half a century of food in Britain, from Vesta curries to nouvelle cuisine

Dinner through the decades

A new BBC series challenged Brandon Robshaw and his family to eat their way from the 1950s to the 1990s
Philippa Perry interview: The psychotherapist on McDonald's, fancy specs and meeting Grayson Perry on an evening course

Philippa Perry interview

The psychotherapist on McDonald's, fancy specs and meeting Grayson Perry on an evening course
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Bill Granger's Indonesian stir-fry recipes

Our chef was inspired by the south-east Asian cuisine he encountered as a teenager
Chelsea vs Tottenham: Harry Kane was at Wembley to see Spurs beat the Blues and win the Capital One Cup - now he's their great hope

Harry Kane interview

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Michael Calvin's Last Word

For the good of the game: why on earth don’t we leave Fifa?
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Scientists hail daily pill that protects against HIV infection

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