News

The private investigator regularly commissioned by senior editors at the News of the World was "generally known" by staff to be part of the paper's "special investigations team", the Old Bailey has heard.

The anatomy of a scandal that refuses to go away

Q. What is the source of the original phone hacking claims?

Screws tighten on 'News of the World' in damning MPs' report

The tabloid, the police and the PCC will be slammed on Wednesday, says Matthew Bell

'Hundreds' of mobiles hacked by newspaper

The row over mobile phone voicemail intercepts by the News of the World is likely to flare up again with a claim today that well over 100 people have had their private accounts hacked.

The <i>IoS</i> Diary (31/01/10)

Up with the lark, out with the owls

Minister embroiled in hacking row over voicemail messages

The controversy over the News of the World is re-opened with new claims about the then media minister and Boris Johnson &ndash; and now footballer Sol Campbell is contacting the police

The Tory peer who wants to convince us the PCC has teeth

Lady Buscombe tells Matthew Bell that the Press Complaints Commission is in the clear

Guardian loses PCC phone-hacking case

The Press Complaints Commission, the watchdog for the newspaper industry, has rejected claims by The Guardian that a widespread and ongoing culture of phone-hacking existed at the News of the World, Britain's biggest-selling Sunday title. After investigation, the PCC reported that it "found no evidence that phone-message hacking is ongoing" at the tabloid, owned by Rupert Murdoch's News International.

Donald Trelford: MPs should be discussing more serious issues than this warming of cold potatoes

As I get older, quite a lot that MPs say and do makes me cross, but I have rarely been so grumpy as I was last week, watching the Select Committee for Culture, Media and Sport resuming its farcical inquiry into phone-hacking and other alleged irregularities at the News of the World.

Matthew Norman: Comical Desi's sword of truth

These are not words I expected to write without some potent psychotropic substance seeping through an intravenous drip, but Richard Desmond becomes a role model to us all. The fearlessness he showed in donning the Jonathan Aitken Memorial Suit of Armour to fight Tom Bower for his good name - and on the notoriously murderous terrain that is Mr Justice Eady's courtroom - speaks for itself. So does the plain spoken reverence for truth displayed in the witness box. Above all, though, it's the Corinthian sunniness that seems such a useful paradigm for troublesome times. The post-verdict statement posted on his own Express web site echoes one of modern history's most resilient wartime orators. Churchill, perhaps, in 1940. Or possibly Comical Ali in 2003 as the coalition tanks rolled into Baghdad. "His biggest mistake," declared Richard of Mr Bower, "was in thinking I would not go to court to fight to uphold my reputation."

I never condoned phone hacking, says Coulson

The editor of the News of the World said today he had introduced "rigorous" safeguards to prevent a repeat of the phone-hacking scandal that resulted in the resignation of his predecessor.

'NoW' hacker had beans to spill and a crust to earn

Peter Burden defends Glenn Mulcaire, the recluse at the centre of a media spat

Pressure grows on Tory communications chief

Andy Coulson is to appear before a select committee this week over his former newspaper's involvement in the phone-tapping scandal

Stephen Glover: The BBC has conspired with The Guardian to heat up an old story and attack Murdoch

How do stories emerge in the media? Some people believe reporters simply write down what happens. I’d say it was a bit more complicated than that. Take, for example, the recent hysteria over News of the World journalists hacking into the mobile phones of celebrities.

Phone hacking allegations are irresponsible, says Wade

News International says accusations are untrue and misleading the public

Deborah Orr: Why is it so hard to prove the obvious?

It's a weird old society indeed when the huge stories that are hardest to break are the ones that everybody knows are true anyway. First, it was the bankers.

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