News

The private investigator regularly commissioned by senior editors at the News of the World was "generally known" by staff to be part of the paper's "special investigations team", the Old Bailey has heard.

Matthew Norman: Why it's always Christmas in Rebekah's world

At a time such as this, when we awake from nightmares of the soup-kitchen queue and grab the laptop to check what manner of mayhem has ravaged Eastern stock markets while we slept, we must avoid resentment towards those better protected than ourselves. So join me in celebrating Rupert Murdoch's soul-gladdening metamorphosis from Herod into Jesus Christ.

Hacker's lawyers say publisher is still liable to pay his legal fees

Rupert Murdoch's News International may have to continue funding the legal defence for the convicted phone hacker Glenn Mulcaire, despite the company's promise to cut off the funds that have so far allowed him not to name the News of the World executives who commissioned him.

Hacking probe shocks Sarah Payne's mum

Police have told the mother of murdered schoolgirl Sarah Payne her phone may have been hacked by a private investigator used by the News of the World, a friend said today.

Tim Lott: Looking back, I'd have avoided hindsight

Politicians confronting the phone-hacking scandal have a new euphemism for 'I thought I'd get away with it'

Phone-hacking scandal: Keep up at the back!

It's quite confusing, isn't it? Let Matthew Bell guide you through the twists and turns of this Shakespearean drama

Glenn Mulcaire legal fees to be stopped

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp announced today that it is to stop paying the legal fees of the private investigator jailed in the phone-hacking scandal.

Letter from the editor: A gentle poaching

It was neither a grilling nor a roasting, perhaps a gentle poaching. The MPs started well, particularly the electrifying exchange between a dogged Tom Watson and Rupert Murdoch, looking every bit his 80 years, forcing son James to act as human shield.

Rebekah Brooks claims she was repeatedly told phone allegations were untrue

Former editor denied she had gone riding with David Cameron or spoken to him about the appointment of Andy Coulson

Hacking: Rebekah Brooks 'told allegations were untrue'

Former News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks said today that she was repeatedly told by the News of the World that allegations of phone hacking by the paper's journalists were untrue.

Brooks volunteered to talk to police – and was promptly arrested

While she was still chief executive of News International and the "fifth daughter" of the Murdoch clan last week, Rebekah Brooks wrote to Scotland Yard offering to be interviewed as a witness in its intensifying investigation into the phone-hacking scandal.

Joan Smith: Let's leave it to journalists to dig up the dirt

When did British journalists start getting entangled with seedy private eyes? Back in the 1980s, when I worked for The Sunday Times Insight team, I spent hours rooting about in archives and trying to persuade strangers to talk to me. We produced lengthy investigations into the Yorkshire Ripper inquiry and the Iranian embassy siege in London; sometimes we used freelances with specialist knowledge, but I can't recall an instance where we turned to a private investigator.

Jean Charles De Menezes family phones may have been hacked

The family of Jean Charles de Menezes, the 27-year-old electrician shot dead by armed police in the wake of the failed 21 July 2005 terror attacks, say they fear their phones may have been hacked by the News of the World.

Criticism rains down on Hayman after select committee grilling

It was "unwise" for the Scotland Yard officer in charge of the original inquiry into phone hacking to dine with News of the World executives at a time when the paper was under investigation, the head of the body which issues national policing policy and guidance said yesterday.

Beyond the law, private eyes who do the dirty work for journalists

Recent disclosures shed welcome light on the shadowy world of investigators

John Yates's confession prompts calls for him to step down

One of Scotland Yard's top officers was urged to resign yesterday after admitting he had appallingly mishandled a review of the initial bungled investigation into phone hacking.

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