News

The private investigator regularly commissioned by senior editors at the News of the World was "generally known" by staff to be part of the paper's "special investigations team", the Old Bailey has heard.

Charlotte Harris: 'Sorry' means something else at News International

What was News International thinking when it released its statement of its intention to apologise on Friday? Getting an apology out of the News of the World has never been easy. Normally, after weeks of front-page splashes and sensational headlines, a tiny, mealy-mouthed apology appears in what feels like the gardening section. So the surprise announcement by News International that it had "decided to approach some civil litigants with an unreserved apology" raised the question of whether such apologies were also going to be in the usual house style.

Damage limitation bid may not placate Murdoch empire's critics

After five years of protesting its innocence, News International offers an 'unreserved apology' for phone-hacking incidents and offers selected victims...a Wapping payout!

Inquiry looms in hacking case as spotlight falls on police failures

The Government yesterday raised for the first time the prospect of a wide-ranging independent inquiry into the conduct of newspapers in the wake of the News of the World phone-hacking scandal.

Hacking: senior News of the World pair arrested

Journalists bailed after questioning on suspicion of criminal conspiracy

Met hacking inquiry chief dined with NOTW staff

The police chief who headed Scotland Yard's inquiry into phone-hacking dined with the News of the World at the height of his criminal investigation into the newspaper.

Leading article: Scotland Yard has much to answer for

Not for the first time, Acting Deputy Commissioner John Yates stood before MPs yesterday to answer questions on how forensic the Metropolitan Police had been in their investigations into phone hacking by journalists from News International, publishers of the News of the World. His responses showed Scotland Yard's handling of the case has been woefully inadequate. Mr Yates repeatedly hid behind the fact that there is an ongoing inquiry to deflect the probing of MPs who were angry that he previously assured them there were very few cases of hacking by reporters from Rupert Murdoch's Sunday tabloid.

BBC 'does use private detectives'

Private detectives have been and continue to be used occasionally by the BBC to help make its investigative programmes, the corporation's director-general has said.

Met fears release of 'evidence' would hurt phone-hacking case

Scotland Yard is seeking to withhold evidence from alleged victims of the News of the World phone-hacking scandal over fears that doing so could endanger its criminal investigation.

An axe murder, a prosecution that failed, and trouble for the Murdoch empire

The fallout from a 1987 killing is a new blow to the 'News of the World' – and embarrasses David Cameron.

Private investigator cleared of murder was on Coulson pay-roll

A private investigator acquitted of one of Britain's longest unsolved murders had extensive links with corrupt police officers and was being paid thousands of pounds to supply information to the News of the World under the editorship of former Downing Street spin doctor Andy Coulson.

Phone hacker told to reveal who hired him

Glenn Mulcaire, the private detective convicted of phone hacking while working for the News of the World, must reveal the names of journalists on the paper who commissioned him to intercept illegally the voicemails of public figures, a judge ruled yesterday.

Glenn Mulcaire must give more information

Glenn Mulcaire, the private detective at the centre of the News of the World phone hacking affair, must give more information to alleged victims and cannot claim the privilege of self-incrimination, a High Court judge ruled today.

Phone hackers targeted treasure trove of information, says Coogan

The comedian Steve Coogan kept a "treasure trove" of information on a mobile phone which he alleges was targeted by a private investigator working for Rupert Murdoch's News International, a court heard yesterday.

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