News

The private investigator regularly commissioned by senior editors at the News of the World was "generally known" by staff to be part of the paper's "special investigations team", the Old Bailey has heard.

Phone-hack detective banned from driving

Glenn Mulcaire, the private detective at the centre of the News of the World phone hacking allegations, was back in court yesterday charged with drinking and driving, for which he was fined £1,000 and banned for a year.

Mark Hughes: This time the victims are being put first

Yesterday's statement by Scotland Yard will be seen as an admission that their first investigation was a failure. The force accepts that it wrongly told a number of individuals that their details did not appear on material seized from Glenn Mulcaire when in fact they did. Yesterday they informed them that their phones may have been hacked.

How Prescott became a key figure in long battle for truth

John Prescott has long condemned Scotland Yard's handling of the original investigation into hacking carried out by a private investigator working for the News of the World.

Blunkett 'was victim of phone-hacking' when in office

David Blunkett, the former home secretary, believes his mobile phone was illegally hacked by journalists while he was in charge of police, prisons and anti-terrorism at one of the most sensitive government departments.

News of the World hacked phones 'to steal stories from rivals'

Phone hacking was allegedly used by the News of the World to obtain a story which rival titles had already obtained via the more traditional Fleet Street tactic of a paid-for "kiss and tell", according to newly disclosed High Court documents.

Andy Coulson leaves No 10 job

Andy Coulson has left his job as Prime Minister David Cameron's communications director, it was confirmed today - 11 days after he announced he was to step down.

Diary: Knives out for Sebastian

Sebastian Faulks is due to present his thoughts on the British novel in his BBC2 series Faulks on Fiction beginning this weekend. In the meantime, British novelists have been passing judgement on Faulks. Michael Arditti wrote on Facebook last week that, when he appeared on Radio 4 to plug his latest novel, a problem arose: "Faulks, whose new TV programme I and my fellow critics had trounced on last week's Saturday Review, was the [next] guest. Slightly Feydeau-esque situation as I was led out of one door while he came in through the other."

Brian Cathcart: Thinking Italian: UK is like Berlusconi without the whores

The phone-hacking scandal is no longer about who at the News of the World knew what was going on. We are a long way past that point. It is about how Britain is governed.

Sheridan jailed for three years as plea for leniency is rejected

A defiant Tommy Sheridan was jailed for three years yesterday after being found guilty of repeatedly lying in a libel trial against the News of the World.

Ian Burrell: So much for the theory of a 'rogue reporter'

With its dismissal of Ian Edmondson, News International abandoned the mantra it has chanted for four years: that phone hacking carried out by the News of the World was the work of a "rogue reporter". That was the line from January 2007, when the paper's royal editor, Clive Goodman, was jailed for illegally intercepting the royal household's messages.

Phone hacking: the next turn of the screw

Senior executive sacked as police launch new inquiry

Jailed Tommy Sheridan to fight conviction

Disgraced socialist politician Tommy Sheridan today vowed to keep fighting as he was jailed for three years for perjury.

More journalists face suspension as NewsCorp tries to limit damage

News International is preparing a new damage limitation strategy which could see the suspension of further journalists on the News of the World as early as this week to meet a demand from Rupert Murdoch that a line is drawn under the phone-hacking scandal.

Hacking: Call to investigate police

MP demands independent review of Met's inquiry / Cameron faces anger over dinner date with Murdoch

Trials and tribulations of News International: Where, exactly, will it all end?

As Andy Coulson leaves the PM's office, James Hanning gets to grips with the convoluted case of hacked phones, detectives, and a red-top newspaper
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