News

The private investigator regularly commissioned by senior editors at the News of the World was "generally known" by staff to be part of the paper's "special investigations team", the Old Bailey has heard.

Pressure grows on Met's phone-hacking inquiry

Pressure was growing on Scotland Yard last night to explain its failure to interview senior executives on the News of the World amid claims that its original investigation into the phone-hacking scandal missed potentially crucial lines of inquiry.

Matthew Norman: Truth will out for Coulson and Blair, but don't hold your breath

The protagonists will continue to tell their half truths, lies of omission, and outright whoppers. This is how scandal unfolds in dozy apathetic Britain

Matthew Norman: So much that the Bible can teach us about Tony Blair

After a hiatus of what feels like several weeks, the anguished wait for the latest tranche of Alastair Campbell's Downing Street memoirs is over. Power And The People, 1997-99 is out this week, and from the serialised snippets it looks a belter. My favourite bit concerns Tony Blair reading his Bible the December 1998 night before the bombing of Iraq, although the reference to it concerning Herod and the John the Baptist makes no sense in the context of that training session for the big match to come.

Prosecutors step in to review Met evidence in phone-hacking scandal

Prosecutors are to re-examine all the evidence amassed by Scotland Yard during its investigation into the phone-hacking scandal at the News of the World.

Celebrities prepare legal cases against Met over phone-hacking

Stars of screen, stage and sport are preparing court action against the Metropolitan Police in a co-ordinated campaign to force the disclosure of more evidence that they believe implicates News of the World executives in the phone-hacking scandal.

Phone hacking: Now Met police are in the dock

Calls for force to lose control of investigation after 'News of the World' executive is suspended

Ian Burrell: 'Hackgate' is a story that refuses to go away

When Rupert Murdoch came to England last October to deliver a lecture, there were some in the audience who raised eyebrows when the media mogul broke off from a paean to Baroness Thatcher to say of his journalists: "We will vigorously pursue the truth – and we will not tolerate wrongdoing."

Coulson to appear in court at perjury trial

David Cameron's director of communications Andy Coulson is to appear at Glasgow High Court next week to give evidence in the perjury case of former Scottish Socialist Party leader Tommy Sheridan.

Press watchdog forced to issue its own apology

Britain's press watchdog, charged with keeping newspapers out of trouble, was in the embarrassing position of having to say sorry itself yesterday, apologising for potentially misleading comments made by its chairman about the phone-hacking scandal.

'Phone-hacking' journalists to be named in court

The private investigator embroiled in the News of the World phone-hacking scandal has been ordered to reveal the names of the journalists who instructed him to illegally intercept private voicemail messages.

Editor denies Tommy Sheridan phone bugging

The editor of the Scottish News of the World today denied being part of an "illegal culture of phone tapping" after Tommy Sheridan suggested his phone was bugged.

Phone-hacking files are passed to prosecutors

Scotland Yard detectives passed a file to the Crown Prosecution Service last night containing "new material" about the alleged widespread culture of phone hacking at the News of the World.

Matthew Bell: The <i>IoS</i> Diary (07/11/10)

No cheese, but the toast of the nation

Coulson may be witness at Sheridan perjury trial

David Cameron's director of communications Andy Coulson may be be cross-examined under oath in a Scottish courtroom at the perjury trial of the former Socialist MSP Tommy Sheridan, it emerged last night. The top Tory aide and ex-News of the World editor has been added to the list of defence witnesses to be called, along with Glenn Mulcaire, a private investigator. Mr Coulson gave a statement to Mr Sheridan's solicitor last month.

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