Environment A baby northern gannet stands next to one of its parents

The first “world championship” for eating pickled baby gannets, known as “guga”, has sparked new calls for a total ban on the Hebridean tradition of hunting chicks by clubbing  them with sticks.

Terence Blacker: Look back in anger management

It is said that sooner or later the small volcano that is John McCain will blow. The presidential candidate has a famously short temper. At some point, during a long and rough electoral campaign, the wrong question will be asked at the wrong time, and the real McCain, red-faced and intemperate, will blast off.

Curry house on a par with Gordon Ramsay

When Mohammad Tayyab heard about the sale of the cafe where he breakfasted daily on tea and toast before beginning work in a sweatshop in London's East End, the recently-arrived migrant seized the opportunity to do something about his yearning for the food of his native Pakistan.

Glass ceiling: Murano, London

There's something pleasingly head-girlish about Angela Hartnett: she radiates good sense, enterprise and unsinkability. She didn't become a kitchen slave in her teens, but took a history degree instead. She learnt home cooking from her Essex-Italian granny. It says much about her strength of character that she has worked for Gordon Ramsay since 1994, without ever being driven to plunge a Sabatier carver between his shoulder blades. When she opened her own restaurant, Angela Hartnett at the Connaught, six years ago, she picked up a Michelin star inside a year.

Wareing outcooks 'stretched' Ramsay

For more than a decade, Marcus Wareing was Gordon Ramsay's publicity-shy "shadow", toiling over the stove for up to 18 hours a day to meet the exacting kitchen standards set by his motormouth boss.

John Walsh: Cut with Gordon's sharp tongue, a protégé escapes hell's kitchen

There's something Oedipal, even Shakespearean, about Marcus Wareing's eclipsing of his former mentor and boss, Gordon Ramsay, in the hierarchy of top London restaurants. It's part of a syndrome in which a former protégé rises to match, then overtake, his beloved master. It happened with Gordon Ramsay who, after enduring years of training, abuse and belittling by Marco Pierre White, left him to go it alone, and comprehensively outclassed him in stars and media recognition.

Pandora: Court in the act: Doherty's band is barred from festival by magistrates

More bad news for Pete Doherty, as we hear that his band is to be barred from performing at the Moonfest music festival this Friday.

Sartorial correctness: Dress me up, dress me down

The venerable Garrick Club is relaxing its clothing rules. Meanwhile, Gordon Ramsay wants his diners to smarten up. John Walsh ponders the long history of sartorial correctness

Robin Scott-Elliot: First catch your dodo

Sport on TV: First catch your dodo then spice with joie de vivre

Hél's kitchen: Helene Darroze at The Connaught, London

So here I am in The Connaught, sitting down to dinner with an Independent-reading couple I have never met before. We're saying our hellos, and ...

Knives out as Wareing turns on his culinary mentor Ramsay

Gordon Ramsay was best man at his wedding, but the celebrity chef's friendship with his most successful protégé, Marcus Wareing, is definitely over.

Ty: 'Hip-hop has no culture'

The outspoken British rapper Ty is declaring war on his peers. Hip-hop is dead, he says, and the future's in spoken word. By Matilda Egere-Cooper

Gordon Ramsay cleared to carry on swearing

An Australian Senate inquiry into bad language used on the country's TV by British chef Gordon Ramsay has rejected calls for a ban on certain swear words.

Ramsay's food too 'timid' for California's tastes

He's done the hype and the star-studded celebrity opening party. Now Gordon Ramsay is experiencing the seemingly inevitable downside to one of his overseas restaurant openings: a critical backlash.

Pandora: 'The Sun' signs its own Warsaw pact

Crack open a can of Tyskie, show some hairy builder's rear cleavage and shout "Na zdrowie" (cheers). The UK's Polish handymen migrants are to finally get their mother-language edition of The Sun, as revealed here seven months ago. Despite denials then, the red-top is to publish the Polish versions during June's Euro 2008, which the England team will miss owing to ineptitude. "Tits and bumskis for the plumbers" at last. The Sun axed hostile coverage of this key growth sector of the white working class and now praises Poles as "such hard-working people that Britain wouldn't be the same without them".

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: Eat only local produce? I don't like the smell of that

The language in this debate is a proxy for anti-immigration sentiments
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003