Environment The olinguito was found in the forests of Colombia and Ecuador

The year we said hello to the olinguito, the kabomani tapir, the Cambodian tailorbird, the leaf-tailed gecko and the tinkerbella wasp

Jellyfish close down nuclear plant

Both reactors at a nuclear power station have been shut down after "high volumes" of jellyfish were found on seawater filter screens.

Beach-goers urged to look out for jellyfish

Holiday-makers are being called on to report their sightings of jellyfish at beaches across the UK, as part of a national survey.

Life was weird 500 million years ago

With its circular jaw armed with an array of fearsome teeth, it cruised the prehistoric seas as one of the top marine predators of its day.

Andrew Martin: A wounded sea takes its slimy revenge

A writer fears the omens as our beaches turn glutinous

Letter: Feline felons

Sir: How observant of Charles Maybourne (Letter, 6 December) to note the predatory instincts of that devilish suburban murderer, the cat. And his concern for the well-being of a select group of garden wildlife is touching. But why stop there? I admit to a great fondness for cats - and robins, blue tits, blackbirds, voles, field mice and newts. But don't all of these themselves prey upon lesser species? Take care, Mr Maybourne - the Invertebrates Liberation Front probably knows where you live.

Acid leaks on to protected marshland

ANTI-POLLUTION TEAMS from the Environment Agency and English Nature were striving last night to contain a major leak of industrial acid onto a protected marshland which is a haven for wild birds.

Letter: Killing shellfish

Sir: I was interested to read about Mr Stookers Housefly, Parasitic and Biting Insect Support Group (letter, 7 September) but surely Hilaire Belloc said the last word on this many decades ago:

Letter: Unfair to shellfish

Sir: We were heartened to see the space given on your letters page to our co-campaigners in the Shellfish Network (3 September). Despite the admitted lowly position of shellfish in the league-table of public sympathy, we at the recently launched Housefly, Parasitic and Biting Insect Support Group believe our constituency to be lower still.

Flatworms that make sex their weapon

HERMAPHRODITE marine flatworms bury their feminine side and behave in the most crude, macho fashion when it comes to mating, indulging in swordplay with their penises. And female oystercatchersare frequently seen to indulge in lesbian copulation when they share a male. These new observations are in the latest edition of Nature.

Triathlon: Jellyfish provide extra challenge

Triathlon

Whatever happened to the New Zealand flatworm?

The moment:The invaders were first noticed on our shores in early 1995: foreigners hell-bent on destruction. They would emerge at night, punch a hole in their prey and suck them dry, before returning to their hiding place. But this was no vampirish European Commissioner - a worse alien had arrived: Artioposthia triangulator, or the New Zealand flatworm.

LETTERS:Why the flatworm is harmless at home

From Mr Rod Blackshaw Sir: Diane Reeder (Letters, 17 January) has posed a frequently asked question about the New Zealand flatworm. Our earthworms are important to the quality of soils and plant growth in the UK. When British earthworms are released intoNew Zealand pasture they increase grass growth and make that country even more green and pleasant.

LETTER : Worm's eye view

From Ms Diane Reeder Sir: How is it that, if the New Zealand flatworm's habit of slurping up the good old British earthworm will devastate this green and pleasant land, New Zealand seems a very green and pleasant land, far from an arid wasteland?

Health Update: Jellyfish joins the low-fat menu

JELLYFISH could be the next popular low-fat health food, say researchers at Auburn University, Alabama. They say the processed fish is low in calories and cholesterol and its texture has been savoured by the Chinese for more than 1,000 years. However, they admit in New Scientist, the jellyfish will need an image change before it finds its way into Western supermarkets.

Letter: Slugs without pain

Sir: Mr Hayward may regard using nematode worms to eat slugs as 'immoral' (letter, 4 March), but the possibility of a slug, let alone any less advanced invertebrate, suffering an 'agonising death' is unlikely, as its nervous system is too primitive for it to feel pain. An analogy would be for a human to have its coat gradually snipped away at; something to avoid, but not at all painful.
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A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

In the final part of our series, Chris Green arrives in Glasgow - a host city struggling to keep the politics out of its celebration of sport
Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

A writer spends a night on the streets

Rough sleepers - the homeless, the destitute and the drunk - exist in every city. Will Nicoll meets those whose luck has run out
Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
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Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

Why did we stop eating whelks?

Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
10 best women's sunglasses

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From luxury bespoke eyewear to fun festival sunnies, we round up the shades to be seen in this summer
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

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Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

18-year-old says this month’s Commonwealth Games are a key staging post in her career before time slips away
The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

Can scientists save our sea life?

By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice