Arts and Entertainment Alain de Botton: 'We need a Jamie Oliver of architecture because architecture is now where food was 20 years ago'

We get what we deserve when it comes to the uninspiring buildings devoid of design in which many of us live and work, according to a panel  member of the first government-commissioned review into architecture in more than a decade.

Jamie's kitchen nightmare: his show is getting the chop

Celebrity chef switched to 'graveyard slot' as TV ratings plummet

The teachers giving lessons in life beyond the classroom

Two enterprising pioneers are setting up a free school that doesn't forget the students when they leave.

Cultural Life: Marianela Nunez, ballerina

Ballet: I went to see the Royal Ballet's 'Giselle' at the Royal Opera House. My fiancé, Thiago Soares, was playing Count Albrecht with Mara Galeazzi as Giselle. It was a wonderful performance. I loved every minute of it. The whole company was brilliant and the production is fantastic in every way. It's one of my favourites to watch and dance.

Johann Hari: What I've got in common with Jamie Oliver's kids

When he watches Jamie's Dream School, the truculent, cynical students are all too familiar to Johann Hari: he spent his teenage years playing arcade games instead of studying. But, as he explains, it's possible to rekindle a love for education, if kindness is on the curriculum

Video: Melbourne Food and Wine Festival featuring Jamie Oliver

This video features Jamie Oliver and is about The 2011 Melbourne Food and Wine Festival - Australia’s internationally acclaimed celebration of food and wine.

Jamie Oliver labels Sarah Palin 'a Froot Loop' over healthy food

Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver called Sarah Palin a Froot Loop for criticising the Obama administration's healthy eating initiatives, and said getting healthy foods to kids is a civil rights issue.

All-star classroom: Jamie Oliver's latest TV show sees high-achieving celebrities become teachers

Can Simon Callow and Cherie Blair convince teenagers who have failed their GCSEs that school can be cool? Gerard Gilbert meets the tutors with a difference

Oliver's American revolution will not be televised in schools

It was his most ambitious project yet, a bid to revolutionise the lunchtime diets of California's children, mirroring the success of his UK school dinners campaign in 2005. Jools and the kids had even been relocated to the sunny west coast of the US. But the Los Angeles schools board has told Jamie Oliver to go twizzle.

Sarah Sands: Jamie can make the sun shine in half an hour

It is not easy flogging books to the public during a recession, and the excellent figures for Penguin last week were cheering. What lifted the fortunes of the publisher was the record-breaking success of Jamie Oliver's 30-Minute Meals. Why this book rather than learning to cook in 24 hours, or like an Italian?

Minor British Institutions: Fish fingers

Ah, the British and food. It doesn't much matter what it is, as long as it's inside something: bread, breadcrumbs, batter, pastry, packet. And if it's easy and good for a laugh as well, bingo. Thus the fish finger, the frozen digit stapled into our lives from weaning (unless you're Nigella, who didn't taste one until she was 19).

Jamie Oliver cooks up record sales for Pearson

The success of Jamie Oliver's latest cookbook helped drive the blue-chip publisher Pearson, which owns Penguin and The Financial Times, to lift its full-year profit forecasts for the third time since July.

Jamie Oliver helps Sainsbury's to a winning Christmas

Sainsbury's was this year's Christmas winner after its Jamie Oliver fronted advertising campaign helped the group outshine rivals, according to research today.

Wallander's last stand: Katy Guest's essential literary look-ahead

Henning Mankell wraps up the detective's final case, plus new work from Ali Smith, Graham Swift, Joyce Carol Oates and a host of others looks set to make this a thrilling year for readers

Editor-At-Large: 'Upstairs, Downstairs' is being lived out in 21st-century Britain

Prince William and our future Queen Catherine say they will not employ any servants after their wedding. Will they be the first members of the royal family to do their own ironing and dusting? William's decision, perhaps taken to emphasise a desire to lead as normal a life as possible, is in contrast to his dad, who employs around 149 staff – 25 of whom are classified as "personal aides", including several butlers, valets and chefs. Charles was even rumoured to have a flunkey to squeeze out his toothpaste for him in the morning. Whatever the truth, the Prince of Wales is serviced by a large, costly team.

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