Arts and Entertainment Alain de Botton: 'We need a Jamie Oliver of architecture because architecture is now where food was 20 years ago'

We get what we deserve when it comes to the uninspiring buildings devoid of design in which many of us live and work, according to a panel  member of the first government-commissioned review into architecture in more than a decade.

13 years, millions in pay – and one ruined set – as Ross signs off

In his rollercoaster career at the BBC, Jonathan Ross made it his personal mission to prick pomposity and court controversy. So it was perhaps fitting that, after a decade of trashing chatshow etiquette, he should bring down the curtain on his Beeb career by meting out the same treatment to his studio set.

Martin Hickman: Mr Lansley, junk food and idiocy

In the 1998 film Bulworth, Warren Beatty's wayward Senator loses his mind and reveals how US politics is bankrolled by big corporations. While not matching the Hollywood actor's looks, the Health Secretary, Andrew Lansley, seems similarly to have taken leave of his senses in a series of announcements that have astonished commentators by their rapidity and foolishness.

More pupils opt for school dinners

The TV chef Jamie Oliver's campaign for healthier school dinners is proving popular with pupils, figures show.

Jamie Oliver urges more investment in school meals

TV chef Jamie Oliver today called on the Government to invest in school meals, as figures showed more pupils were eating them.

Jamie Oliver health approach 'doesn't work', says Health Secretary

Jamie Oliver’s highly publicised campaign to get school children eating health food has lost its government backing. Andrew Lansley, the Health Secretary, has said that the celebrity chef’s insistence on serving healthy food in school dining rooms had had the perverse effect of sending school children out to the shops during the lunch break to buy junk food.

Jam: Summer in a jar

If you think life's too short to make jam, then you'll be surprised how simple it is to turn the season's berries into tasty preserves. Alice-Azania Jarvis stirs it up

Travel Challenge: A cookery holiday in Andalucia

Every week we invite competing companies to give us their best deal for a specified holiday. Today: a cookery holiday in southern Spain in mid-June. Prices are for two people travelling together.

Terence Blacker: Depressing clichés sadly perpetuated

Whenever a successful woman experiences some kind of career freak-out, the great Having It All debate is re-ignited. Sometimes it is a politician who decides to spend more time with her family who sets the whole thing rolling, sometimes a TV presenter who goes into emotional meltdown.

Susie Rushton: 'Get out of the kitchen and vote'

In many ways, particularly at meal times, Jamie Oliver gets my vote. If you're hungry and it's almost pay day and the only vegetable left in Tesco is a rock-hard butternut squash, you can do a lot worse than make his Party Squash Soup (get the recipe for free from his website).

Pandora: 'Blue Peter' Konnie's sister takes red corner

Among the election candidates dodging the flying eggs and inopportune heckles is one familiar face: Rupa Huq, Kingston University lecturer, bona fide hip-hop DJ and sister of Konnie Blue Peter Huq.

Pandora: Not Mrs Prescott's cup of tea, surely?

Once upon an election campaign, John Prescott found himself struggling with his temper after an onlooker pelted him with an egg. Now it's the turn of the former deputy PM's photogenic wife, Pauline, to bare the brunt of a grassroots protest.

Leading Article: School meals may give us reason to celebrate, but not quite yet

It is good to know that Jamie Oliver's school meals not only taste better but are producing better-performing children in Greenwich, the local authority where he introduced his culinary revolution. Pupils' Sats results at the age of 11 improved after they switched from "turkey twizzlers" and chicken dinosaurs to creamy coconut fish and Mexican bean wraps. The number of "authorised absences" also fell.

Jamie Oliver's better dinners improve pupils' results

Jamie Oliver's healthy school dinners have produced a marked improvement in national curriculum test results, according to the first-ever research into their impact on standards, published today.

Rose Prince: And what first drew you to the turkey millions, Mr White?

Can Marco, Gordon and Jamie retain culinary integrity when they play shop

'Growing her own': the green-fingered Anna Greenland

Anna Greenland, 28, is passion about ‘growing her own’ and has won a place on a top horticultural course in America
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent