News Isabella Sorley, 23, and John Nimmo, 25, arrive at Westminster Magistrates Court, London

Two people have pleaded guilty to sending "menacing" tweets to a feminist campaigner following her successful campaign to ensure a woman features on British banknotes.

Elizabeth Jenkins: Novelist and biographer acclaimed for her lives of formidable women

At the noble age of 100, the novelist and historical biographer Elizabeth Jenkins published The View from Downshire Hill. She subtitled it modestly "A Memoir" but that word enshrines a host of recollections of time past. It was her 24th book. Her nephew, Sir Michael Jenkins, recalls in his fine introduction how he encouraged her to write it, he tells us, as being personally "rather like her books, a combination of understanding and insight".

Cultural Life: David Baddiel, writer

Theatre: I don't go much. I never got taken when I was young and it still feels a bit of an alien experience. I did, however, see 'Hair' in the West End recently, which I thought was great, and 'Red' on Broadway, which had some brilliant acting in it but dramatically was simply Rothko's essays put into dialogue.

Book Of A Lifetime: Le Rouge et Le Noir, By Stendhal

I was around 17 when I first read Stendhal's novel 'Le Rouge et le Noir' ('Scarlet and Black'), and the powerful effect it had on me can only be understood in the context of my life at the time. Until the age of eight, I lived near Beaconsfield and my father commuted to London. Then, in 1949, we moved to a large 18th-century rectory in the North Riding of Yorkshire. There the social landscape was more like Jane Austen's Hampshire than suburban Bucks in the 20th century.

Rupert Cornwell: Why Harper Lee is likely to miss her own party

Out of America: 'To Kill a Mockingbird' is 50, its author reclusive

Good to a Fault, By Marina Endicott

Tale of woe soon makes an impact

Emma Thompson: How Jane Austen saved me from going under

The actress reveals how adapting 'Sense and Sensibility' for the screen helped her to recover from depression

Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict, By Laurie Viera Rigler

The protagonist Courtney Stone wakes up in a dream, and "doomed to be an anachronism" since it is now 1813 England, rather than the present-day Los Angeles from which she hails. She revels in the reflection of the unfamiliar woman gazing back at her – a woman called Jane Mansfield. She also has to inhabit an entirely different body of thought and feeling, and over the course of the novel will struggle to fit into some rigid notions. Jane has just awoken from a riding accident and is confronting a world deciding how to treat her: is she best off in an asylum? Or having "the offensive humours in the blood" drained out of her? Or simply eating and sleeping well?

Howard Jacobson: Come to an American university and be instantly promoted to professor

Their courteousness can get in the way of your knowing what they think

Hamish McRae: Now it's the BBC's turn to experience a dose of reality

There is a temptation to pile the pressure on the corporation. But we must resist it

Talking about Jane Austen in Baghdad, By Bee Rowlatt and May Witwit

Written as email exchanges between a BBC World Service journalist ensconced in the middle-class haven of North London and a beleagured Iraqi academic (and Chaucer expert) in Baghdad, this could have been a lazy format for a book in our blogosphere age.

Love Me, Love Me Not, Edited by Katie Fforde and Sue Moorcroft

To celebrate its 50th anniversary, the Romantic Novelists' Association has edited an anthology of new short stories from 40 of its members – many of whom say they'd have given up on writing without the association's support.

The Week In Radio: From female fascists to Jane Austen's iPod

Like the great white shark in Jaws that bobs up from nowhere, so P D James rose from apparently calm waters to devour an unwitting Mark Thompson. Did the Director General even see what was coming as the baroness sliced lethally through his arguments on the subject of BBC salaries and the need for the head of paperclips to earn £300,000? Either way, James's boat-rocking interview was a signal that this is going to be an important year for the corporation. An election is coming, and there is an Opposition with definite ideas about the BBC's future. So where better to start the debate than with programmes that truly justify the licence fee?

Seduction without the sex

The subtle eroticism of ITV's gripping Sleep With Me is more about mind games, domination and submission than raunchy scenes
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The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss