News Isabella Sorley, 23, and John Nimmo, 25, arrive at Westminster Magistrates Court, London

Two people have pleaded guilty to sending "menacing" tweets to a feminist campaigner following her successful campaign to ensure a woman features on British banknotes.

TB may have killed Jane Austen

Novelist Jane Austen may have died from tuberculosis rather than Addison's disease as is widely believed, an expert said yesterday.

How We Met: Lucy Cohu & Anna Maxwell Martin

'Men drop like flies around her – they make fools of themselves and she's not even aware of it'

Observations: Thomas Arne is due a revival after 166 years

"Rule, Britannia!" is one of the most familiar tunes in Britain, but whatever happened to its composer? This season marks the tricentenary of Thomas Arne, the compositional superstar of 18th-century Britain, yet now virtually forgotten beyond that one aria. To celebrate, the Royal Opera House is presenting his opera Artaxerxes which was premiered in the same spot in 1762, but has not been heard there (or in many other places) since 1843.

Jane Austen's Guide to Good Manners, By Josephine Ross

Few Jane Austen enthusiasts will not have realised what a delicate business it was to be a lady or gentleman of standing in Regency England.

Has the costume drama had its day?

The BBC's lavish new adaptation of Emma has seen its ratings slide. Jonathan Brown ponders the future of bonnets-and-breeches TV

The secret blood-sucking world of Mr Darcy

Zombies, vampires and monsters are taking over Jane Austen's classic novels

Incendiary play about Paris riots gets first showing

The Massacre was a play that was written 200 years ago for the British stage but was never performed because of its inflammatory depiction of the infamous ‘September massacres’ during the French revolution in1792.

Edward Neill: Incisive literary critic noted for his work on Jane Austen and Thomas Hardy

Edward Neil was a brilliant, incisive and brave literary critic. He taught at various academic institutions, including the Open University, Chelsea College, and latterly at Middlesex University where he was Senior Lecturer in the School of Humanities and Cultural Studies. He wrote many articles for a variety of distinguished publications, and was never afraid to expose the fads and fashions underpinning much literary discourse. He had the gift for revealing fresh insights into the staid and accepted, most notably in his work on Jane Austen and Thomas Hardy.

Prodigal son parable wins Orange Prize

American's work is unanimous choice of panel judging £30,000 book prize

Paul Burston: Gay London's Jane Austen

A fearless chronicler of modern gay life in all its glory and grotesqueness: Paul Burston explains why he is neither an Alan Hollinghurst or a Jackie Collins

Jane's Fame: How Jane Austen Conquered the World, By Claire Harman

The novels of Jane Austen were almost consigned to history, before Walter Scott came to their rescue
News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
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Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmA cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
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Flora Spencer-Longhurst as Lavinia, William Houston as Titus Andronicus and Dyfan Dwyfor as Lucius
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Stir crazy: Noel Fielding in 'Luxury Comedy 2: Tales from Painted Hawaii'
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Flow chart: Karl Landsteiner discovered blood types in 1900, yet scientists have still not come up with an explanation for their existence
lifeAll of us have one. Yet even now, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
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'Weird Al' Yankovic, or Alfred Matthew, at the 2014 Los Angeles Film Festival Screening of
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New Real Madrid signing James Rodríguez with club president Florentino Perez
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Hotel Tour d’Auvergne in Paris launches pay-what-you-want
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn