News Isabella Sorley, 23, and John Nimmo, 25, arrive at Westminster Magistrates Court, London

Two people have pleaded guilty to sending "menacing" tweets to a feminist campaigner following her successful campaign to ensure a woman features on British banknotes.

DAYS LIKE THESE: 4 February 1813

Jane Austen writes to her sister Cassandra: "Our second evening's reading [of Pride and Prejudice, recently published] to Miss B. had not pleased me, but I believe something must be attributed to my mother's too rapid way of getting on: though she perfectly understands the characters, she cannot speak as they ought. Upon the whole, however, I am quite vain enough and well satisfied enough. The work is rather too light and sparkling; it wants shade; it wants to be stretched out here and there with a long chapter of sense, if it could be had; if not, of solemn nonsense, about something unconnected with the story; an essay on writing, a critique on Walter Scott, or something that would form a contrast, and bring the reader with increased delight to the playfulness of the general style."

YOU ASK THE QUESTIONS: So, Joanna Trollope, do you consider yourself to be the modern Jane Austen? Why are you obsessed with the clergy? And do you enjoy shocking your readers?

Joanna Trollope, 61, was born in Gloucestershire. A fifth-generation niece of Anthony Trollope, she read English at Oxford University, working in the Foreign Office and then as a teacher before becoming a full-time author. She wrote historical novels under a pseudonym until the publication of her first contemporary novel, The Choir, in 1987. She has written 12 contemporary novels, of which four - The Rector's Wife, A Village Affair, The Choir and Other People's Children - have been adapted for television. Her UK paperback sales total more than 6 million. Twice married, she has two daughters, and now lives alone with her dog near Cirencester, and in London.

The truth about Calamity Jane

Doris Day made her a gender-bendin', pistol-packin' songthrush. Jane Russell stripped her down to her bloomers. But who was the real Calamity Jane?

In a Good Light by Clare Chambers

A happy childhood's a bad start in life - you never get over it

The Bequest by John de Falbe

A genteel voyage with brandy and cigars

Hot Spot: Winchester, Hampshire

Top-flight schools and historic buildings keep demand high in this ancient city, says Robert Liebman

The godmother of feminism, warts and all

Mary Wollstone Craft: a revolutionary life by Janet Todd (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £25)

LIFE DOCTOR

MODERN PSYCHIATRY suggests that Ebeneezer Scrooge was not a mean old git at all. He was just depressed. He exhibited classic signs of anhedonia - the inability to experience pleasure. He had very little appetite, experienced sleep disturbance and found other people's good cheer irritating.

Film: A novel idea for a film

Good books make bad movies. Or do they? Brainy writers have finally made friends with Hollywood.

The old ones are the best

What's so great about classic novels that they're always on TV? How about plot, characters, dialogue...
News
newsAnother week, another dress controversy on the internet
Sport
Dave Mackay lifts the FA Cup in 1967 having skippered Spurs to victory
football
Life and Style
Scientist have developed a test which predicts whether you'll live for another ten years
health
Life and Style
Marie had fake ID, in the name of Johanna Koch, after she evaded capture by the Nazis in wartime Berlin
historyOne woman's secret life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
News
news... and what your reaction to the creatures above says about you
News
Jihadi John
newsMonikers like 'Jihadi John' make the grim sound glamorous
Arts and Entertainment
As depicted in Disney's Robin Hood, King John was cowardly, cruel, avaricious and incompetent
film
Life and Style
Travis Kalanick, the co-founder of Uber, is now worth $5.3bn
tech
News
Homer’s equation, in an episode in 1998, comes close to the truth, as revealed 14 years later
science
News
news
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn