Arts and Entertainment

DVD channel 4  (136mins)

Agathe von Trapp: Eldest daughter of the family who inspired 'The Sound of Music'

Agathe von Trapp was the eldest daughter of the Austrian family who inspired the Rogers and Hammerstein Broadway production and film The Sound of Music. The film was a worldwide sensation, smashing box-office records and snapping up five Oscars. With figures adjusted for inflation, in 2010 The Sound of Music was ranked 3rd in the all-time list of biggest-grossing films, only behind Gone with the Wind and Star Wars. However, the film detracted somewhat from the reality of the Von Trapps' experience and left them distressed, without the consolation of remuneration from the film's vast profits.

The BBC bunker they don't want you to know about

Who knew that, 10 storeys beneath a Worcestershire hill, the corporation is ready for Armageddon?

My Austria: A few of Ben Fogle’s favourite things...

With or without the sound of music in the air, the Austrian Alps provide the perfect setting for families to enjoy the outdoor life

Prom 49: A Celebration of Rodgers and Hammerstein/The John Wilson Orchestra

It was as close as we get to being guests on the 20th Century Fox soundstages circa.1955. As the Main Title of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! glided effortlessly into “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’” and the John Wilson Orchestra’s burnished trumpets poured on their sun-kissed vibrato the sound, the style, the feel of how this music in these arrangements should go was “right” – every sigh, every swoon, every refined inflection. It couldn’t have been “righter”.

Full bloom: Kristin Scott Thomas discovers life after the English rose

For years, she was typecast as a frosty English rose. But then something remarkable happened – and Kristin Scott Thomas blossomed into one of the most interesting actresses of our age

Johan Grimonprez, The Fruitmarket, Edinburgh

Countless airplanes, one after the other, explode on the screen in front of you, on the runway and in the sky, terrifying in their horrifying, graceful demise. How can we understand such footage? What has it done to us? Can artists tell us? You might find some answers to these questions at Edinburgh's consistently excellent Fruitmarket Gallery, in an exhibition devoted to the works of the Belgian anthropologist-turned-film-artist Johan Grimonprez.

Pandora: Dave's home affairs?

While Gordon Brown ensured events in Westminster took a fresh twist yesterday, David Cameron's domestic arrangements were also the subject of some timely title-tattle among senior Tory colleagues.

Terence Blacker: What were Julie's fans expecting?

Julie Andrews is one of those public figures who, probably through no fault of her own, has become a larger-than-life representative of a range of contemporary clichés. For some, she is the wholesome, faintly sexless Englishwoman, a trilling, skipping optimist who embodies a lost age of virtue and kindness; for others, she is a ludicrous, old-fashioned goody-goody. For quite a few, she is a much-loved gay icon.

An Evening with Julie Andrews, O2 Arena, London

Reviewed by Michael Coveney

Julie Andrews: She's climbed every mountain

Nearly half a century after the films that turned her into a screen legend, the star with the purest of voices has a new stage show. And if cruel fortune has stopped her singing quite like she used to, her place in people's hearts is assured.

Julie Andrews returns to the stage: 'A few of my favourite things ...'

To mark the singer's UK appearance this week, The IoS asked her fans to share their collections.

All My Shows Are Great: The Life of Lew Grade, By Lewis Chester

A new biography of Lew Grade is a tender portrait of a much-loved man, and the epitaph he deserves

Ghost Stories, Lyric Hammersmith, London

It's not often that the standard pre-show announcement to switch off mobile phones and resist using cameras causes the audience to jump out of its collective skin. But Ghost Stories takes care to put the frighteners on the public well before the lights go down. The publicity blatantly advises people of a nervous disposition or women in the later stages of pregnancy to stay away. One senses that there might be a spoof element to this, as well as a canny reverse come-on, but one can't be sure. This critic – who even screamed as a child during the movie of The Sound of Music on discovering that that nice blonde messenger-boy had become a Nazi – toyed with the idea of securing a sick note from his doctors. I'm glad that I didn't because Ghost Stories, though lethally well-paced in its visceral scariness, proved to be more a fascinating think-piece – as technically dazzling as it is morally teasing – than the stuff of ongoing future nightmares.

A century of distinction: 100 women who changed the world

On the eve of the 100th of International Women's Day, the <i>IoS</i> brings you its guide to the 100 British women who, arguably, have done most to shape the world we live in today

My Secret Life: Cat Deeley, television presenter, 33

My parents were ... total dudes. Strict, but kind – and they instilled in me the confidence to be whoever I wanted to be.

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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones