Arts and Entertainment

Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen, London

Terror alert: how four-year-old information was transformed into clear and present danger

The Bush administration was forced into the embarrassing admission yesterday that "new" intelligence about al-Qa'ida's plans to attack US financial institutions - information that led to an official alert and a slew of fresh security measures - was up to four years old and predated the 11 September attacks.

How to get ahead in the name game

The other day I dared to wonder out loud what on earth it was that made Kate Moss so special, because I couldn't see it.

The Creek Dippers, The Borderline, London

The bittersweet sound of love

Extracts from Graham Jones' 'Last Shop Standing': Week 1

Last Shop Standing lifts the lid on an industry in tatters. Graham Jones has worked at the heart of record retailing since the golden era of the 1980s. He was there during the years of plenty and has witnessed the tragic decline of a business blighted by corruption and corporate greed. Last Shop Standing is a hilarious yet ahrrowing account by a man who has been there and sold that.

Rock: Lust for married life

TORI AMOS ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL LONDON

The Independent Archive 27 September 1989: `A simple idea, but very revealing at its best'

`Juke Box Jury' has returned to the screen in its Sixties format. Jim White takes a first peek

Fashion: Racy, original and totally mad about glamour

Is it a sex shop? A film set? No, Joie is London's new fashion mecca, and it's worlds away from Bond Street.

Pop: God is in the Details No 2: `Don't give up'

POP MUSIC is not a great medium for natural dynamics. Music technology puts a thick black line around every element - as in a painting by Patrick Caulfield. There's little room for the blending and delicate brush strokes you expect in jazz or classical music. Yet the process of multitrack pop recording (once cynically described to me as the art of removing all dynamics and personality from the original performance - then taking days to put them all back in again at the mixing stage) has yielded some striking moments of beautiful artificiality. One of the best is in the final minute of "Don't Give Up" (So, Virgin PGCD5), after Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush have stopped singing and the bassist Tony Levin comes to the fore with a sneaky, reggae-flavoured riff. The recording puts you right in the middle of the rhythm section - the drums are close, and played hard, but the bass is much louder than it could ever be if you were really listening in that studio. Gabriel is giving us a privileged insight into the intimate workings of the recording studio.

Arts: Best of brood

English fiction has no more potent character than Heathcliff. John Sutherland compares versions of Emily Bronte's anti-hero

Music: All lies! A total fabrication!

Roy Harper has given mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to a sheep. He lives in Gormenghast Castle. And he's far, far grumpier than Van Morrison. Still, by all accounts he is a folk legend.

I got you, Baebes

Is the appeal of 12 modern girls singing plainsong all just hype? Joanna Briscoe meets them

Comedy: An evening with the It-Guy and all his alter egos

Steve Coogan Lyceum, WC2

Music: A choirgirl confesses all

Barking mad or not, Tori Amos can whip up a crowd with a heady mix of musical virtuosity and intimate revelation. James McNair bears witness

Interview: Something never changed

John Walsh meets ex-Strangler Hugh Cornwell. Photograph by Donald MacLellan

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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
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Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor