Kate Winslet

Acceptance speeches: Say it in five words

Tonight is the 17th annual Webby Awards, which are almost as famous for their five-word acceptance speeches as they are for the websites rewarded for their excellence.

Christina Patterson: The Artist is a reminder of some of the things

On Saturday night, in a cinema in Dalston, the audience clapped. They may or may not have clapped after the event that took place next, which was a "happening", involving live, human beings, and which sounded to me as weird as the outfits of the trilby-headed hipsters I had to squeeze past. But what they clapped when I was there wasn't human, and it wasn't alive. What they clapped was a film that had just finished called The Artist.

Germany has yet to rid itself of its guilt over the Nazis, says

Bernhard Schlink, the best-selling author of The Reader, a post-Nazi era novel adapted into a film starring Kate Winslet, yesterday spoke about the extent of "collective guilt" which survives to this day among generations of Germans because of the atrocities of the Third Reich.

Now it's Titanic in 3D

A deep-sea expedition will explore the world's most famous wreck site – so you can do the same

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Millvina Dean: The last survivor of the sinking of the Titanic

Millvina Dean had the double distinction of being both the youngest passenger on the Titanic and the last of the survivors of its sinking in the Atlantic in 1912. Her life almost ended at the age of nine weeks when the liner sank after its collision with an iceberg. But instead of a tragically short life she had a particularly long one, reaching the age of 97.

DVD: The Reader (15)

With Billy Elliot director, Daldry, at the helm, playwright David Hare penning the screenplay and Kate Winslet and Ralph Fiennes in the leading roles, The Reader should surely be a classic.

Why blockbusters still matter

Have the Oscars swung too far in favour of indie movies? Without big-budget hits, everyone loses, says Geoffrey Macnab