News

The "Wrecking Ball" singer features in the moodily lit Spring 2014 campaign, but there’s something up with her co-star.

Film: Half-baked in the sun

The Big Pictures: HIDEOUS KINKY (15) DIRECTOR: GILLIES MACKINNON STARRING: KATE WINSLET, SAiD TAGHMAOUI, BELLA RIZA 99 MINUTES HOW STELLA GOT HER GROOVE BACK (15) DIRECTOR:KEVIN RODNEY SULLIVAN STARRING: ANGELA BASSETT, WHOOPI GOLDBERG, REGINA KING 124 MINUTES

Arts: Sense and sensibility

Neil LaBute's latest film is another portrait of bad behaviour with laughs. At whose expense?

I sailed in the Titanic show - and survived

Notebook

`Titanic' turns disaster into a theme park

IT WAS a disaster. It became a movie. Inevitably, it is now a theme park.

Going Out: Event: Titanic exhibition

Overhyped, overboard and next week it's coming over here - the Titanic Official Movie Tour at Wembley Exhibition Hall 2 sails into "London, England" on Wednesday of next week. While Leonardo DiCaprio, and Kate Winslet are unlikely to put in an appearance, visitors can examine the stars' costumes and later wander the sizeable recreation of the Titanic set. This comes complete with lights, cameras, props, costumes and other filmic paraphernalia.

Letter: Winslet's wedding

Sir: I cannot comment on the other instances mentioned in Emma Cook's sneering article "How lo-fi can you go?" (25 November) but I can speak with some authority about Kate Winslet's wedding. It was as near a normal wedding as someone in Kate's position was going to be allowed and it was thoroughly genuine. I try to ensure that each couple marrying in my church do so in the style most appropriate to them, and I am quite clear that we achieved that aim in Jim and Kate's case. If they had wanted opera singers, string quartets, costumes and stage sets we could have accommodated them, and it would have been splendid, but it would not have reflected the people that they are.

The Critics: Video

Titanic (12). James Cameron's vapid historical epic prioritises spectacle over substance, and verges on crassness throughout; it's also, as you know by now, the highest-grossing movie in history. The film's many fans and defenders seem not to care that Cameron's script is virtually sub-literate in parts, and that the first half of this three-hour-plus movie is lethally dull (not to mention clogged with some of the most ridiculous cliches ever seen on screen). Predictably, the film kicks into high gear as soon as the ship goes down, though it's worth noting that in Cameron's version of events, the lookouts fail to notice the looming iceberg because they're busy watching Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet snog. Winslet emerges unscathed, which is saying something since she's required to quote Freud and babble on about Picasso. The same cannot be said for DiCaprio, who, on the basis of this film, Total Eclipse, and The Man With the Iron Mask, should never be allowed to appear in any movie that is set before 1980.

In the sticks: Yes, children, your mother is a bag lady

WHEN I was married, which feels like several incarnations ago - the sort of thing you might uncover after hypnosis - preparing for the start of the new school year was like the mobilisation of the Russian Army for the First World War. Six weeks was the bare minimum to allow supplies and transport to be in a stage approaching combat readiness. Everything had to be bought, name-taped, washed, ironed and ready almost before the end of the summer term.

Television: The most incredible hulk in the world

Robin Buss views the Titanic through the eyes of a claustrophobe

Letter: Ulster's Titanic

THE NORMALLY estimable Robert Fisk writes an interesting article on the symbolism of the Titanic (Comment, 30 march). However he gets one major symbol totally wrong, as did the film.

Letter: Titanic and stunning

ALTHOUGH the take on Titanic was quite witty, it is insensitive and bitchy to keep talking about Kate Winslet's weight (Eye, 27 March). She is within perfectly normal parameters for a person of her build, and she looked stunning at the Oscars.

50 ways to drown a movie star

By Rosa Prince and Michael Greenwood

Why America's teenage girls can't get enough of 'Titanic'

The boat may sink, but a new feminist role model has risen on the silver screen

When the cameras stop rolling, dress to please yourselves

The fashion police have felt the frayed collars of two of Britain's best young actors. Melanie Rickey senses a miscarriage of justice

RNLI targets `Titanic' viewers

Film-goers traumatised by watching Kate Winslet battle against a watery grave in the blockbuster movie Titanic are donating hundreds of pounds to a lifeboat charity on their way out of the cinema.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003