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The "Wrecking Ball" singer features in the moodily lit Spring 2014 campaign, but there’s something up with her co-star.

'Our ley-line runs from the top of Glastonbury Tor through our garden and my bed'

Dulwich Art Gallery has pulled off a coup in getting those two legal eagles and bosom buddies, Cherie Blair and Hillary Clinton, to be joint Honorary Patrons of the first-ever exhibition devoted to the works of 17th-century Dutch artist Pieter de Hooch. An innovatory painter of interiors, de Hooch has long been overshadowed by his great contemporary, Vermeer, and fully merits this review, which will travel to Connecticut after the Dulwich show in the autumn. I wonder, however, if America's First Lady is aware that de Hooch's subject matter is somewhat racier than his irreproachably worthy colleague? As one study of his work notes: "He turned to genre paintings showing young men and women ... flirting in well-appointed interiors." Female figures appear in more than 25 of the 40 paintings due to be shown. If Hillary manages to drag Bill along from his onerous duties in the Oval Office, the Presidential couple would be well advised to avoid being photographed next to A Soldier Offering a Glass of Wine to a Seated Woman. Perhaps A Woman Delousing a Child's Hair might be more appropriate.

Coming to the aid of the party

It's a tricky business, being cool. One minute you're in, next minute... who? It's a problem that faces Tony Blair, who has done his best to glamorise Downing Street with a succession of high-profile parties drawn from the ranks of those who put the cool into Britannia. Or do they? Red or Dead designer Wayne Hemingway reckons that too many of the guests were plain naff. Far too '97. Rosa Prince helps the PM recover his street cred with a party list of the newest, coolest people in town

Cinema: Kate Winslet: the sinking man's crumpet

TITANIC (12) is one of the most spectacular films ever made. It's also one of the most badly written. And yet, despite the abyss between James Cameron's meagre screenwriting talents and the apocalyptic grandeur of his direction, Titanic stays afloat. The dialogue may be unspeakable, but the film remains unsinkable.

Worse things happen at sea

Despite early hype predicting box-office disaster to match that of `Waterworld', `Titanic' is now the hot tip to clean up at the Oscars. Billy Zane, one of the film's stars, recalls life on-board

Film: I've got that sinking feeling

the big picture

Film: Whenever you get that sinking feeling, get busy

Director James Cameron has been haunted by death since he was a boy. His latest film, `Titanic', is about two-and-a-half hours in the life of people who know they face death. He tells Nick Hasted about his `metaphor for mortality'.

Brits go for Oscars on wings and water

Two UK actresses are emerging as favourites for the Academy Awards, reports Tim Cornwell. But there's no contest between the films

Film: American graffiti

Forget the summer blockbusters. Full-scale war breaks out only once a year in the movie industry, and that's at Christmas time, with the lucrative holiday box-office up for grabs and the Oscar race in its all-important final stages. The mad rush starts this week with the long- delayed docking of James Cameron's Titanic, drifting in on a tidal wave of gush from enraptured US critics. It's probably safe to say that you can see where every last cent of the $200m budget went in this lavish spectacle; my main complaint is that you also can't help but feel every last second of its three hours and 14 minutes (the "official" running time, as cited by the studio, is "two hours, 74 minutes"). In Cameron's version of events, the lookouts fail to notice the iceberg because they're busy watching Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet make out. As post-collision chaos erupts, DiCaprio's character - street-smart scamp that he is - shrewdly notes: "This is bad." (DiCaprio has already butchered Shakespeare and reinvented Rimbaud beyond recognition; Titanic merely fortifies the argument that he should never, under any circumstances, appear in a film set before 1980).

Have they all completely lost the plot?

Story is everything, they used to say in Hollywood. But now studios are making big bucks with big bangs and big stars alone, it's the 'eye candy' that counts, writes Tim Cornwell

Neeson wins best actor for `Michael Collins'

The star of Michael Collins, the controversial film about the murdered IRA hero, took one of the top prizes at a film-awards ceremony last night.

Gored to death

'My favourite quote of all is from Hitchcock: "Other people's films are slices of life. Mine are slices of cake." ' Peter Jackson (left), director of 'The Frighteners', talks to Ryan Gilbey

Alas, poor Shakespeare: Branagh rewrites Hamlet

Actor shows his own play's the thing - but can he upstage the award-winning Emma Thompson?

Film: Sex and death in the West Country

The Critics

Film: The dead crow society

We shouldn't be surprised by Michael Winterbottom's bleak vision of `Jude'. This is the man who gave us `Butterfly Kiss' and `Cracker'. By Chris Peachment

Film: Hardier than the rest, JUDE Michael Winterbottom (15)

This is not pretty costume drama. It's tragic, raw and brutal. As it should be. By Adam Mars-Jones
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