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The Analyst: Departing Woodford sounds a warning note over the

The biggest fund manager story of 2013 was the resignation of Neil Woodford from Invesco Perpetual. As you will be aware, Mr Woodford will continue to manage the Invesco Perpetual Income and High Income Funds until he leaves at the end of April, following which he will set up his own company.

Barcelona fail to pay player wages

Barcelona president Sandro Rosell has revealed the extent of the financial worries at Barcelona, admitting the players' wages for last month have not been paid.

Roger Trapp: 'Zombies are all the rage in the movies and books this

“Zombie banks” first emerged as a term in the late 1980s and came to be associated with the crisis that affected Japan in the 1990s, turning a once-thriving economy that was the envy of the world into a byword for stagnation. Now, Mark Thomas of the management consultants PA Consulting claims that the financial crisis that started in the autumn of 2008 has left behind a “zombie economy”. In his recently-published book of the same name, he states: “Even though many countries are emerging from a technical recession, the crisis has created a new class of groups and institutions which, although not completely ceasing to exist, have lost the ability to function normally.” As he explains, this means that, while these organisations do not cease to exist, they have become unable to perform the functions “that we expect of them in supporting growth of the economy.” Accordingly, zombie banks cannot lend as we need, zombie consumers cannot consume as we need and so on.

Prom 60: Lang Lang, Royal Albert Hall, London

An intimate little affair after Beijing but the Royal Albert Hall could not have been fuller. The Lang Lang Olympics were about to commence. A little Sunday-afternoon Mozart – Piano Sonata in B-flat major – eased us into the first lap, articulated with such deftness that the idea of the piano as a percussive instrument seemed almost absurd. The slow movement took on a mystical quality, the dynamics so refined as to lend a whole new meaning to the term "Chinese whispers".