Alan Bennett has accused Nina Stibbe's book of 'misremembering' him

Alan Bennett says Nina Stibbe's Christmas hit book Love, Nina ‘misremembers’ him

As literary monsterings go, accusing Alan Bennett of being good at fixing washing machines is at the milder end of the scale. But for the celebrated playwright, the allegation of mechanical competence has proved too hard to stomach.

Ned Vizzini: Writer

Author whose accounts of his battles with depression gave hope to young people who were similarly afflicted

Invisible Ink: No 204 - Ghost writers

Remember the odd history of Virginia Andrews? Her Flowers In The Attic novels began appearing in 1979 and became surprise best-sellers. They were airless, claustrophobic works about four siblings locked in an attic in order to gain an inheritance. The incestuous melodramas appealed to teenaged girls, so when Andrews died in 1986 she was replaced by a ghost writer called Andrew Neiderman, who penned more than 40 further volumes in her name. They did so well that her estate kept her alive and earning, the Inland Revenue Service cannily arguing that her name was still a taxable asset.

Between The Sheets: What’s really going on in the world of books

Just to make you feel old, 2014 is the 25th anniversary of Michael Rosen and Helen Oxenbury’s classic children’s book, We’re Going On A Bear Hunt. “Swishy Swashy! Squelch Squelch! Hooo wooo!” and all the rest. The book has sold more than 8 million copies in 18 languages, but initially Rosen didn’t think that it would work: “The story seems to have originally been a folk song,” he says. “David Lloyd at Walker Books saw me perform it and asked me to write it down. So I added to the story and, 18 months later, I was stunned to see the beautiful pictures that Helen had created – the family adventure is from Helen’s imagination and I enjoy and admire the book almost as an outsider – but back then I couldn’t quite figure out how it would work as a book!” To celebrate, Walker will publish an anniversary edition in January and an interactive sound book in the summer, and in February the Royal Festival Hall in London will host a “promenade performance”, where children will be invited to dress up and take home a pair of bear ears. Oxenbury recalls illustrating the book: “Michael and I never met until after the book was finished, but what was wonderful about it was there was nothing described in a way that restricted me. I modelled the children and the dog on my own. The bear’s posture I modelled on a friend who had depression, with his dropped shoulders – I felt the bear was probably lonely and wanted company rather than eat the children!” So now we know. We’re not scared!

The dogs of Littlefield, By Suzanne Berne - Review

The Orange Prize winner Suzanne Berne is on familiar ground with her fifth novel examining life in an affluent American village. Littlefield, Massachusetts, is named one of the 10 best places to live in America. Curiously, it also houses an unusually high number of psychotherapists. Clarice Watkins, a sociologist from the University of Chicago, decides to study Littlefield to find out exactly what makes it such a good place to live. She arrives to find a town at war, split between those who want their dogs to be off the leash in the local park and those who object. Opinions become more polarised when someone starts poisoning dogs and an undercurrent of fear pulses through the community.

Best European Fiction 2014, Preface by Drago Jancar - Review

Several stories in Best European Fiction 2013 were so haunting that it feels like the 2014 anthology has come around too quickly. Time flies when you’re discovering innovative literature in translation, although perhaps “discovering” is the wrong word when some of this year’s contributors, including Norway’s Kjell Askildsen, have been publishing in their own languages for decades, while others, such as France’s Eric Chevillard, have been translated into English elsewhere. Readers from the UK can feel like Johnny-come-latelies at the continental fiction party but that’s no reason to be discouraged. This annual anthology, which in 2014 contains 28 contributions from across Europe, derives its richness in part from placing celebrated authors alongside emerging voices.

Reading a novel may boost brain functionality for days, new research has found

Brain function 'boosted for days after reading a novel'

Reading a gripping novel causes biological changes in the brain which last for days as the mind is transported into the body of the protagonist

The novel cure: Literary prescriptions for misanthropy

Ailment: Misanthropy

Neil Gaiman has won Book of the Year 2013 with modern fantasy novel The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane wins Book of the Year 2013

The author beat novels from Kate Atkinson and David Walliams

Facebook and Twitter top twenty: The Independent stories you've been sharing this year

From drunken nights out with a llama to testicle-eating fishes, it’s a mixed bag of stories you’ve been sharing on social media in 2013.

Among the top twenty Independent articles you’ve been tweeting and posting on Facebook this year, there are serious reports, ferocious comment pieces, astounding research and a fair few articles that pay tribute to the adage ‘the truth is stranger than fiction.’

Totally off the wall: Helen Monks and Alex Davies in 'Raised by Wolves'

Raised by Wolves: TV review - Working-class heroes from Wolves are a howling success

Well, this was brilliant. Raised by Wolves was a half-hour sitcom pilot written by Caitlin Moran and her sister Caroline Moran. It was set in the modern day, but based on their own childhood growing up as two of eight, home-schooled, in a three-bed council house in Wolverhampton.

The View from the Train: Cities & Other Landscapes By Patrick Keiller: book review - A delightful journey in search of Britain's urban hinterlands

Arthur Rimbaud's shimmering poetry collection, Illuminations, was partly inspired by his visit to London in 1872. Brocaded with a dizzy-making imagery of subways, viaducts, raised canals, bridges and steam engines, the poems are thrillingly metropolitan. Accompanied by his lover Paul Verlaine, Rimbaud noted down all he heard and saw. In some ways, Illuminations can be read as a poetic gloss on Karl Marx’s Das Kapital: the London masses as seen by the 19th-century French poet are alienated by “economic horrors” and “feel no need to know one another”.

The Whitaker's Quiz of the Year: Round 11 - Books

1. Who was revealed to be the real author of The Cuckoo’s Calling, written under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith?

The Whitaker's Quiz of the Year: Round 1 - Hatched, Matched and Dispatched

Have you been paying attention this year? Can you name 2013’s winners and losers, its sports heroes and political zeroes? Twelve months is a long time in news, but if you think you know who’s who, and what’s what, pit your wits against Whitaker’s Almanack quiz

Sam Swann as Peter Pan, held by the Shadows

Wendy and Peter Pan, theatre review: 'Warm, irreverent humour surges through this saga of empowerment'

Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon

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German soldier who died fighting for UK in Battle of Waterloo should be removed from museum display and given dignified funeral, say historians

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