Life and Style

David Phelan discovers how to survive a Las Vegas trade show

Plans for new runways at Heathrow and Stansted are withdrawn

The airport operator BAA bowed to the inevitable yesterday and formally announced it was abandoning plans for new runways at Heathrow and Stansted.

Airlines lukewarm on plans to axe third Heathrow runway and reform tax regime

Britain's aviation industry was lukewarm in its response to policy changes proposed by the newly formed Liberal-Conservative coalition yesterday.

UK airports reopen

All UK airports opened for business yesterday after the volcanic ash cloud drifted away from British airspace. However, passengers were warned that the ash cloud could cause disruption for "the foreseeable future".

Volcanic ash cloud costs BAA £28m

The volcanic ash cloud cost the airport operator BAA £28m by forcing the closure of Heathrow and Stansted for six days earlier this month.

Rhiannon Harries: When did traipsing round an airport in socks 'improve' our lives

If you have passed through an airport recently (volcanic ash permitting), you will probably have experienced the feeling of powerlessness specific to international travel. They've got something you want, and if you're to be sure of getting it, you're going to have to toe the line – whether padding sheepishly around security in odd socks or biting your tongue in the face of those officious types so often gainfully employed in transport hubs. At such moments, physical reality gives the recent declaration by EU Commissioner Antonio Tajani (below), that travel is a "right", a run for its money.

Empty skies proved that airports cause pollution, say researchers

Scientists have used the no-flying period caused by the ash cloud to show for the first time that airports are themselves significant causes of pollution. Although long suspected, the fact that mass take-offs and landings are large pollution sources could never be proved before, because aircraft pollution could not be measured as separate from the pollution caused by vehicles operating near by.

The ten best ways to pass the time at the airport

Bored stuck waiting for a flight out of Europe? Here are ten ways to help while away the time until you get your flight.

Best campaigner: Lily Kember

The government's disastrous plan for a third runway at Heathrow Airport is on the ropes. And the campaigning of Lily Kember is a major reason why. Just over a year ago, Lily and almost 60 other activists from Plane Stupid brought Stansted Airport to a halt. On a freezing December morning, they used bolt-cutters to enter a secure area and stopped flights from taking off. Still a student at the time, Lily said: "Being arrested is a terrifying prospect, but it is not nearly as terrifying as the threat of climate change."

John Sauven: Labour should accept the inevitable: the plan is dead

The case against the third runway

Terror alert turns back UK-bound plane

A British-bound passenger plane was involved in a security alert today and had to turn back only 15 minutes into its flight, according to reports.

Government advice on third runway was 'unfair'

Devisive plans to build a third runway at Heathrow airport were given "conspicuously unfair" approval by the Government after it ignored its own targets to slash greenhouse gas emissions, the High Court has been told.

Scanners 'are threat to privacy not health'

Full body scanners being introduced at airports to tighten security pose little risk to passengers but raise concerns about privacy, according to a radiology expert.

Airport body scanners 'may be unlawful'

The use of body scanners at UK airports may be unlawful, the Equality and Human Rights Commission warned today.

Alex Deane: Demolish the myth that safety, in and of itself, is an absolute good

In arguing against airport body scanners, I've been met with variations on an increasingly prevalent fallacy: "if it makes us a little safer, it's worth it"; "if it saves one life, stops one crime..." What a specious argument that is. It would "save one child" to ban the car, but we don't, because it would be disproportionate and we have to get on with normal life, even if we incur a slightly higher element of risk in doing so. Safety, in and of itself, is not an absolute good.

Competition Commission to appeal BAA bias ruling

The back-and-forth over the ownership of key UK airports took yet another turn yesterday as the Competition Commission (CC) launched an appeal against a ruling that there was "apparent bias" in its decision to break up owner BAA.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project